One Book Recommendation

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Postby Beyond Birthday » Sun Nov 14, 2010 4:53 am

The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya. It's a light novel (around two-hundred pages) and, in the US at least, is recommended for ages fourteen-and-up. In other words everyone here will be able to breeze through it. At the same, though, it's probably the only slice-of-life story that includes references to Hyperion and advanced mathematics. I don't want to reveal too much but think of it as a deconstruction of anime in general.

...okay, too vague. Umm...if you like anime or the more lighthearted Discworld novels then you'll probably like this one.
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Postby mystmoon » Sun Nov 14, 2010 2:47 pm

Beyond Birthday wrote:The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya. It's a light novel (around two-hundred pages) and, in the US at least, is recommended for ages fourteen-and-up. In other words everyone here will be able to breeze through it. At the same, though, it's probably the only slice-of-life story that includes references to Hyperion and advanced mathematics. I don't want to reveal too much but think of it as a deconstruction of anime in general.

...okay, too vague. Umm...if you like anime or the more lighthearted Discworld novels then you'll probably like this one.

Do you mean this?
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Postby bikkit » Sun Nov 14, 2010 3:40 pm

THAT.

My friend watches that.



I have chaned my recomendation. I now reccomend: Mistborn:The final empire by Branodn Sanderson.

It's a reeeeeaaaallly great read.
No, seriously.
To me, it really stands apart from other books of the "Fantasy with magic assaassin-people" genre. <- genre desription fail.

It's about a revolution, basically. Against a god. In a world where ash falls from the sky on a regular basis and the plants are brown.
but less lame than I make it sound.

Its funny in places but delivers double-whammy of a plot twist when you least expect it.

READ IT.


I have to admit:I cried for ages at one point.

But that's just me. And I am strange.
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Postby Beyond Birthday » Sun Nov 14, 2010 8:15 pm

Yeah, that one. It started off as a series of light novels that are just now being released outside of Japan. It's original enough for people outside of their teens to enjoy. I mean, I once tried reading stuff like the Artemis Fowl sequels much later, only to find that the writing was too simplistic and childish for me. Less so with Haruhi Suzumiya. Though if you don't like anime humor, which seems to consist of one person yelling at another or pointing out flawed logic, then you won't like Haruhi Suzumiya.
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Postby Beyond Birthday » Sun Nov 14, 2010 8:15 pm

Oh, and the next two books have already been released (in the US at least).
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Postby BaldJean » Thu Nov 18, 2010 9:52 am

"The City of Dreaming Books" by Walter Moers. Moers is to Germany what Pratchett is to the UK; a highly comic author in the fantasy genre, but with lots of fans outside of fantasy literature. His imagination is endless. He also illustrates his own books (he started as a comic book author, and there was a movie made after one of his most popular combic book cgaracters, "Das kleine Arschloch" "The Little Asshole"), and the illustrations are great.
There is even a TV-program based on one of his characters, "Käptn't Blaubär" ("Captain Bluebear").
This book is an ideal start into his crazy world. I am not sure all of Moers' books have been translated into English, but this one has.

Here a review of "The City of Dreaming Books" from Amazon:

After reading the first few pages, I fully intended to give this book a poor rating. The audacity, to write a book about excellent writing, without Moers writing also being of highest caliber. How presumptuous, how arrogant. The writing was merely poorly crafted children's fare, perhaps excusable only because the book is translated. It had an interesting, wonderful idea, of pursuing a world based on reading and books, but it would have been far more interesting and relatable if it had been about humans, rather than this silly dinosaur.

I repent. Most completely. I was wrong in every way. This is one of the finest fantasy novels I've ever read. Moers actually takes a talking dinosaur and makes him interesting and a complete character, to say nothing of the other species and humans in this world. Moers doesn't rely on creatures others have constructed, but in every step forms his own creations.

The character development in this novel is astounding, and so much deeper than what you find in most modern novels. This is a novel for adults with depth (and definitely not for children). It is not only extraordinarily well written throughout, but I now see those first few pages were exactly the right build-up, and the old-fashioned style (Dear Reader) fit exactly the theme and points Moers wanted to convey.

I was supposed to do a lot of other tasks, and read other books. I couldn't stop reading this one. To say the unexpected happened is to say far too little, for Moers grabbed me by the collar and pulled me along his story so that I was continuously out of breath and at wit's end trying to guess what would happen next. Every word in this is honed. I am only sorry that it took me a while to realize that most names were purposeful, and often anagrams of actual writers. It takes true brilliance to create an engaging story that is at the same moment a profound commentary on the modern literature industry.

City of Dreaming Books is a multifaceted universe like nothing else you've ever read. There is no comparison. It is a book created for those of us who love books. It is the book that you have been waiting for. It is the last book you need to read- or the last book you'll read purely for itself, for, in every book you read after this, there will be the memory of the perfection you once found here.
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Postby pip » Thu Nov 18, 2010 9:55 am

BaldJean wrote:"The City of Dreaming Books" by Walter Moers. Moers is to Germany what Pratchett is to the UK; a highly comic author in the fantasy genre, but with lots of fans outside of fantasy literature. His imagination is endless. He also illustrates his own books (he started as a comic book author, and there was a movie made after one of his most popular combic book cgaracters, "Das kleine Arschloch" "The Little Asshole"), and the illustrations are great.
There is even a TV-program based on one of his characters, "Käptn't Blaubär" ("Captain Bluebear").
This book is an ideal start into his crazy world. I am not sure all of Moers' books have been translated into English, but this one has.

Here a review of "The City of Dreaming Books" from Amazon:

After reading the first few pages, I fully intended to give this book a poor rating. The audacity, to write a book about excellent writing, without Moers writing also being of highest caliber. How presumptuous, how arrogant. The writing was merely poorly crafted children's fare, perhaps excusable only because the book is translated. It had an interesting, wonderful idea, of pursuing a world based on reading and books, but it would have been far more interesting and relatable if it had been about humans, rather than this silly dinosaur.

I repent. Most completely. I was wrong in every way. This is one of the finest fantasy novels I've ever read. Moers actually takes a talking dinosaur and makes him interesting and a complete character, to say nothing of the other species and humans in this world. Moers doesn't rely on creatures others have constructed, but in every step forms his own creations.

The character development in this novel is astounding, and so much deeper than what you find in most modern novels. This is a novel for adults with depth (and definitely not for children). It is not only extraordinarily well written throughout, but I now see those first few pages were exactly the right build-up, and the old-fashioned style (Dear Reader) fit exactly the theme and points Moers wanted to convey.

I was supposed to do a lot of other tasks, and read other books. I couldn't stop reading this one. To say the unexpected happened is to say far too little, for Moers grabbed me by the collar and pulled me along his story so that I was continuously out of breath and at wit's end trying to guess what would happen next. Every word in this is honed. I am only sorry that it took me a while to realize that most names were purposeful, and often anagrams of actual writers. It takes true brilliance to create an engaging story that is at the same moment a profound commentary on the modern literature industry.

City of Dreaming Books is a multifaceted universe like nothing else you've ever read. There is no comparison. It is a book created for those of us who love books. It is the book that you have been waiting for. It is the last book you need to read- or the last book you'll read purely for itself, for, in every book you read after this, there will be the memory of the perfection you once found here.


Are the books available in english.

My german is ok but i'd struggle.

It does sound interesting.
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Postby BaldJean » Thu Nov 18, 2010 10:39 am

At least "The City of Dreaming Books", "13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear", "Rumo" and his latest, "The Alchemaster's Apprentice" (which I have not read yet; it is on my X--mas wishlist) are availabe in English. Don't start with "Rumo"; you will get a wrong impression of him. Not that it is a bad book, but there is a lot of bloodshed in it, and I mean a lot, and that is quite unusual for Moers. Nevertheless a great book though.
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Postby pip » Thu Nov 18, 2010 10:41 am

BaldJean wrote:At least "The City of Dreaming Books", "13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear", "Rumo" and his latest, "The Alchemaster's Apprentice" (which I have not read yet; it is on my X--mas wishlist) are availabe in English. Don't start with "Rumo"; you will get a wrong impression of him. Not that it is a bad book, but there is a lot of bloodshed in it, and I mean a lot, and that is quite unusual for Moers. Nevertheless a great book though.

Cheers.
Always looking to expand the reading. :D
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Postby bikkit » Thu Nov 18, 2010 8:28 pm

YAY! Other people read walter moers, too! :D
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Postby mystmoon » Thu Nov 18, 2010 10:01 pm

Fund Retromancer by Robert Rankin in the library, so that is going to get a lot of attention soon
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Postby BaldFriede » Fri Nov 19, 2010 2:02 pm

Does anybody of you know Matt Ruff? If not, I highly rdcommend either "Fool on the Hill" or "Sewer, Gas and Electric".
Last edited by BaldFriede on Fri Nov 19, 2010 3:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby poohcarrot » Fri Nov 19, 2010 2:03 pm

'ere! That's two books! :shock:
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Postby BaldFriede » Fri Nov 19, 2010 3:31 pm

Well, read "Fool on the Hill" then. There are three plot strands which seem to have nothing to do with each other at first, but in the end they all come together.
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Postby CrysaniaMajere » Fri Nov 19, 2010 7:01 pm

BaldJean wrote:"The City of Dreaming Books" by Walter Moers. Moers is to Germany what Pratchett is to the UK; a highly comic author in the fantasy genre, but with lots of fans outside of fantasy literature. His imagination is endless. He also illustrates his own books (he started as a comic book author, and there was a movie made after one of his most popular combic book cgaracters, "Das kleine Arschloch" "The Little Asshole"), and the illustrations are great.
There is even a TV-program based on one of his characters, "Käptn't Blaubär" ("Captain Bluebear").
This book is an ideal start into his crazy world. I am not sure all of Moers' books have been translated into English, but this one has.

Here a review of "The City of Dreaming Books" from Amazon:

After reading the first few pages, I fully intended to give this book a poor rating. The audacity, to write a book about excellent writing, without Moers writing also being of highest caliber. How presumptuous, how arrogant. The writing was merely poorly crafted children's fare, perhaps excusable only because the book is translated. It had an interesting, wonderful idea, of pursuing a world based on reading and books, but it would have been far more interesting and relatable if it had been about humans, rather than this silly dinosaur.

I repent. Most completely. I was wrong in every way. This is one of the finest fantasy novels I've ever read. Moers actually takes a talking dinosaur and makes him interesting and a complete character, to say nothing of the other species and humans in this world. Moers doesn't rely on creatures others have constructed, but in every step forms his own creations.

The character development in this novel is astounding, and so much deeper than what you find in most modern novels. This is a novel for adults with depth (and definitely not for children). It is not only extraordinarily well written throughout, but I now see those first few pages were exactly the right build-up, and the old-fashioned style (Dear Reader) fit exactly the theme and points Moers wanted to convey.

I was supposed to do a lot of other tasks, and read other books. I couldn't stop reading this one. To say the unexpected happened is to say far too little, for Moers grabbed me by the collar and pulled me along his story so that I was continuously out of breath and at wit's end trying to guess what would happen next. Every word in this is honed. I am only sorry that it took me a while to realize that most names were purposeful, and often anagrams of actual writers. It takes true brilliance to create an engaging story that is at the same moment a profound commentary on the modern literature industry.

City of Dreaming Books is a multifaceted universe like nothing else you've ever read. There is no comparison. It is a book created for those of us who love books. It is the book that you have been waiting for. It is the last book you need to read- or the last book you'll read purely for itself, for, in every book you read after this, there will be the memory of the perfection you once found here.


Wow that's interesting !! I will have to find out if it has been translated into italian, I really hope so, what is the German title? Die Stadt der Traumen Buch? No, it doesn't sound right, I'll search for it , it looks really interesting to me ^_^
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