People who don't like Discworld!

Moderators: Jason, Toothy, Tonyblack

Postby Sjoerd3000 » Thu Nov 19, 2009 10:43 pm

s more than me :wink:
A poster outside one shop urged people to Dig For Victory, as if it were some kind of turnip.
User avatar
Sjoerd3000
Member
 
Posts: 8797
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2009 5:23 pm
Location: Groningen, The Netherlands

Postby Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit » Thu Nov 19, 2009 10:46 pm

Jan Van Quirm wrote:*nods at Tina* Off topic can be a wild and wonderful ride but "I don't like being anywhere other than Boston" (or near Tokyo come to that) isn't really that enthralling or indeed inventive :?

Although.... "I don't like Cornwall" just now - it's blowing a bloody hurricane virtually down here to the extent that I made the dog come in as I thought he was going to be shredded through the garden fence earlier :shock:


Oh dear, I just had the oddest picture of Tom and Jerry and Tom in slices.
Aha! So, Bob's yer uncle... very clever.
User avatar
Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit
Member
 
Posts: 3885
Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 7:25 pm
Location: Byron IL USA and The Quirm School for Young People ... it's genetic, you know

Postby poohcarrot » Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:32 pm

In order to try and stop another American breaking out civil war, I'd just like to say;

TIME OUT

I'm not a moderator and I'm p*ssed (ie; drunk coz I know you Yanks think p*ssed means angry)

I believe Jeffinboston is a very funny guy. I hope he doesn't leave because of what I'm about to say but;

He is also a pompous, superior, know-it-all.

Tina had every right to have a go at him for his comments about early TP books and Rincewind. If Jeffinboston had prefaced his opinions with "I think..." it wouldn't be a problem. But he didn't. It's "this is right and anyone who thinks differently is wrong".

I'm sure Tina will accept his apologies for being a condescending twit and we'll all live happily ever after.
"Disliking Carrot would be like kicking a puppy."
"You kicked a puppy," Lobsang said accusingly.
User avatar
poohcarrot
Member
 
Posts: 10425
Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2009 12:11 pm
Location: NOT The land of the risen Son!!

Postby Jan Van Quirm » Fri Nov 20, 2009 3:11 pm

Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit wrote:... I shall forgive you, in advance, for the rant I shall undoubtedly recieve for saying this but HUSH, you are hurting my eyes....

... We live where we live... It is, what it is and that, is THAT!

No worries pooh dear - Tina's already done it and it's put to bed with no (or very little) sulking :wink:

Now - People who don't like Discworld... are missing out on something fantastic and should be treated gently as it's pointless telling them they have no imagination or soul and a pitiful, narrow and decrepit sense of humour. :twisted: Let's not blame them for this - if everyone was a Pterry fan how could we all stand out so shiney, perky and happy in a sea of mediocre and lustreless drudgeland tomes where partial or wholly recycled long-standing traditions and tired old mythic mores bring on yer athsma 'cos of the dust avalanche every time you turn a page. Places where everyone has an unassailable Cinderella complex and heroes are forced to overcome the Dragons of Banal and Pointless Geas and keep on apologising for their evil but noble ancestral stereoptypes that nobody else gives a rats arse about...

... as for those who castigate fantasy altogether as 'fluff' and weird juvenile comics - leave them to their trite coffee table books that are there as aesthetic furniture and never opened to read for the 'wonderful photography' is all they can aspire to discuss. :lol:

We do not have to launch a jihad against such feeble and closed unfortunates do we? The prophet has shown the way - belief in reality is fleeting and uncertain. It is what you make of it and if others spurn the unreal playthings of the mind and ideas that take form in the imagination out of a chaotic and unmindful multiverse - then it's just tough on them! :P
"Some men see things as they are and ask why. Others dream things that never were and ask why not.” George Bernard Shaw
User avatar
Jan Van Quirm
Member
 
Posts: 10585
Joined: Fri Nov 07, 2008 9:07 pm
Location: Dunheved, Kernow

Postby Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit » Fri Nov 20, 2009 4:22 pm

:lol:
Aha! So, Bob's yer uncle... very clever.
User avatar
Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit
Member
 
Posts: 3885
Joined: Tue May 05, 2009 7:25 pm
Location: Byron IL USA and The Quirm School for Young People ... it's genetic, you know

Postby CrysaniaMajere » Sat Nov 21, 2009 11:07 am

I've missed quite a debate it... fortunately I think :lol:
Well I don't know anyone who doesn't like Pratchett. I know many people that don't want to try it because they snob fantasy as a children-thing, so they don't even count.
Those who have read his books have loved it.. but i know only 2 people.. guess there's quite a lot of the snob-people around.. but i don't care and I've always a Pratchett's book in my purse or sometimes in my hands when I go out :D
User avatar
CrysaniaMajere
Member
 
Posts: 1863
Joined: Sat Oct 10, 2009 4:16 pm
Location: italy-genova

Postby Ponder Stibbons » Wed Dec 30, 2009 10:50 am

Image
I tried discworld on quite a few of my friends. I think the boring prologue's put them off. I think the Tiffany AChing series are better for weaning younger people onto it.
Mind you, one guy in my class last year said that 'WIntersmith' was really boring adn that its' "what, just some story about a stupid girl who's a witch". The 'girl' might have put him off.
Smilies are friends, not food. Image
..............Now You See It, Now You Don't..............Image
Proud Copper Widow
User avatar
Ponder Stibbons
Member
 
Posts: 1304
Joined: Sun Jun 14, 2009 2:31 pm
Location: Indonesia, and a small space in my head.

Postby Penfold » Wed Dec 30, 2009 5:36 pm

I've lent a few Discworld books to friends only to have them returned with comments along the lines of "I didn't get it/enjoy it/understand the references (to other authors such as Shakespeare, H. P. Lovecraft, Fritz Lieber)", etc. Maybe being a bit more widely read over a variety of subjects and genres helps to understand the satire?

However, I have had more success lending the non-Discworld books in that I've lost numerous copies of Good Omens and The Unadulterated Cat from persons who 'forgot' to return them, despite handing back the others.
The difference between fiction and reality? Fiction has to make sense.
12
User avatar
Penfold
Member
 
Posts: 7215
Joined: Tue Dec 29, 2009 1:59 am
Location: Worthing

Postby Quark » Thu Dec 31, 2009 3:03 am

It's probably best to read a bit of mediocre fantasy before reading Discworld books... just so that you understand exactly how satirical it is.

Now - People who don't like Discworld... are missing out on something fantastic and should be treated gently as it's pointless telling them they have no imagination or soul and a pitiful, narrow and decrepit sense of humour. Let's not blame them for this - if everyone was a Pterry fan how could we all stand out so shiney, perky and happy in a sea of mediocre and lustreless drudgeland tomes where partial or wholly recycled long-standing traditions and tired old mythic mores bring on yer athsma 'cos of the dust avalanche every time you turn a page. Places where everyone has an unassailable Cinderella complex and heroes are forced to overcome the Dragons of Banal and Pointless Geas and keep on apologising for their evil but noble ancestral stereoptypes that nobody else gives a rats arse about...

... as for those who castigate fantasy altogether as 'fluff' and weird juvenile comics - leave them to their trite coffee table books that are there as aesthetic furniture and never opened to read for the 'wonderful photography' is all they can aspire to discuss.


Ditto.
Image
User avatar
Quark
Member
 
Posts: 785
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 11:27 am
Location: The blogosphere

Postby Vena Ravenhaired » Thu Dec 31, 2009 1:48 pm

Well, The first Discworld book I read was Lords and Ladies, I was a bit dubious at first, although many friends raved about them. The thing which put me off, making me think they were for juveniles was Josh Kirby's* covers.

Once I got past the covers, I found a vastly entertaining world of possibilities. Serves me right for judging books by covers, but, in all things, first impresions Do count.

The newer covers, Paul Kidby and the photographic covers are much more appealing to me personally, and hhpefully will bring many new folk into the Pratchett fold.

Cheers, Vena

* Nothing wrong with Josh Kirby's artwork, BTW, I have some of the covers in poster form, and they are great, but as covers they really put me off the books.
I wish I was a glow worm, A glow worm's never glum, How can you be unhappy when the sun shines out yer bum?
User avatar
Vena Ravenhaired
Member
 
Posts: 81
Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2009 10:38 am

Postby Quark » Thu Dec 31, 2009 2:30 pm

I always liked the Paul Kidby covers, myself, and they certainly didn't make me think that they were juvenile. The photographic covers all look a bit... serious.
Image
User avatar
Quark
Member
 
Posts: 785
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 11:27 am
Location: The blogosphere

Postby Moist von Lipwig » Thu Jan 21, 2010 12:02 pm

I am happy I convinced my mother to reeading Terry. She was..."afraid" of him, she told me that couple of times. First book she has read was Hogfather and she was depressed she doesn't understand. She would start to not liking Terry but I gave her Mort.
User avatar
Moist von Lipwig
New member
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 7:28 am
Location: Ankh-Morpork

Postby unseenu » Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:14 pm

i confess i was given a discworld novel when i was very young and didn't take to it(i think it was carpe juggulum).I read the description of great atuin but when i tried to read the rest i found i couldn't understand any of it.

But then when i was a little bit older i saw the light when i saw a big cardboard display case in the school library which said "Surrender to Pratchett",not wanting to disobey an order :lol: i checked out Equal Rites and loved it.Thats how i got started with Terry Pratchett.I still have the book i was given and never read properly somewhere,i will read it and hopefully understand it this time if its ever found.
unseenu
Member
 
Posts: 414
Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2010 10:51 am
Location: Hull,uk

Postby Tonyblack » Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:51 pm

unseenu wrote:i confess i was given a discworld novel when i was very young and didn't take to it(i think it was carpe juggulum).I read the description of great atuin but when i tried to read the rest i found i couldn't understand any of it.

But then when i was a little bit older i saw the light when i saw a big cardboard display case in the school library which said "Surrender to Pratchett",not wanting to disobey an order :lol: i checked out Equal Rites and loved it.Thats how i got started with Terry Pratchett.I still have the book i was given and never read properly somewhere,i will read it and hopefully understand it this time if its ever found.
Welcome to the site unseenu! :D

I'm glad you gave Terry a second chance.
"Goodness is about what you do. Not what you pray to."
User avatar
Tonyblack
Moderator
 
Posts: 28997
Joined: Fri Jul 25, 2008 4:29 pm
Location: Cardiff, Wales

Postby Dotsie » Fri Feb 19, 2010 7:02 pm

Welcome unseenu :D Carpe Jugulum is very good, but only after you've read the other witch books that come before it I should think.
What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!
User avatar
Dotsie
Member
 
Posts: 9413
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 11:07 am

PreviousNext

Return to Discworld novels

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot] and 3 guests