I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Who's Wee Dug » Thu Dec 26, 2013 1:00 am

Would'nt be Detriot by any chance would it ;) :lol:
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Natalya » Thu Dec 26, 2013 7:26 am

Quatermass , thank you very much for such interesting and useful topic! :)

ChristianBecker wrote:Ah, yes, I used to think it was "tshemistry" instead of "kemistry"....

Oh, It's my favourite mistake! :?
When I'm saying "tshemistry" at my English lesson and then I see how teacher glares at me, I usually start to shout 'OH, MY GOD, NOOO!... kemistry, KEMISTRY, OF COURSE, KE-MI-STRY!!!!! ' :lol:
I know how is right but ... I don't know why I usually say "tshemistry" :( I reckon This is a sort of subconscious thing :)
Best regards! :)
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Mazekin » Thu Dec 26, 2013 10:27 pm

I've been working in a call centre the past few months servicing England - was amazed when I asked if I could speak to Mr XXX, and he went quiet for a moment and then blurted out 'Ireland...West....Are you from Ennis?' He was only 20 kilometres out. And there was me thinking I had a classy non-identifiable Irish accent
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Sister Jennifer » Fri Dec 27, 2013 4:09 am

I got New York, Newark/Paterson & Yonkers which I'd never heard of before.
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby =Tamar » Fri Dec 27, 2013 7:14 am

If you take it over again, you get some different questions.
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Catch-up » Sat Dec 28, 2013 5:40 pm

Here are a couple that have been driving me crazy. I don't know if it's a (U.S.) regional thing or what? The first is the strange use of the phrase "speak to", as in "I cannot speak to the menu changes." with the meaning that they cannot comment on it because they didn't experience it. "I cannot speak OF the menu changes" makes sense to me.

The other one is saying that you are or were standing "on line" to refer to being IN a line or queue. Unless there's a line painted on the ground, under your feet, you are standing IN a line, not ON a line.
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby =Tamar » Sat Dec 28, 2013 6:11 pm

Catch-up wrote:Here are a couple that have been driving me crazy. I don't know if it's a (U.S.) regional thing or what? The first is the strange use of the phrase "speak to", as in "I cannot speak to the menu changes." with the meaning that they cannot comment on it because they didn't experience it. "I cannot speak OF the menu changes" makes sense to me.

It's a phrasal verb that I believe began with bureaucrats, or at least with some group that thought it sounded sophisticated. I agree with you, it doesn't make sense.

Catch-up wrote:The other one is saying that you are or were standing "on line" to refer to being IN a line or queue. Unless there's a line painted on the ground, under your feet, you are standing IN a line, not ON a line.

I agree 100%. I believe that came from computer people talking about being online and having to wait for the system to do something (back when you could go get a cup of coffee from another room waiting for your email program to load). Then people imitated the sound without paying attention to the sense. It's still foolish.

On the other hand, it sounds odd to me when people from the UK refer to living "in" a street when they mean they live in a house that is alongside the street. To me, being "in" a street means literally standing on the tar surface and at risk of being hit by a car. Technically, the American idiom of living "on" a street should mean the same thing, but it's the idiom I'm familiar with; note that living "on the street" is not the same as living "on [specific name] street."
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby raptornx01 » Sat Dec 28, 2013 6:48 pm

The "on line" thing was around before the internet was a thing. I remember hearing it, and even using it, as a kid.
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Catch-up » Sun Dec 29, 2013 3:12 pm

I could see that being the case for "speak to" Tamar. It does sound like some weird corporate phrase. It reminds me of the corporate craze to put "age" at the end of everything, "signage" "verbage". That sounded stupid to me too.

Perhaps the "on line" thing is regional then. It seems that a lot of people from the east coast use it. Rap, are you originally from Florida?

One British phrase that used to sound odd to me was "on the Saturday" instead of "on Saturday."
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby janet » Sun Dec 29, 2013 10:43 pm

Is it me? I hate the way local journalism is dumbing-down the English language when it should be trying to promote correct usage.....eg.
The injured woman was sat in the front passenger seat of the car

No. She was sitting in the front seat

Journalists use expressions such as "off of" and that means what?

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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby hnorwood » Mon Dec 30, 2013 11:10 am

I dislike the use of "leverage" as a verb. I think it first appeared in the IT world (don't they always?) and has migrated to other areas. It really makes no sense to me. But then I think a lot of "corporate" babble is used to hide the fact that there is nothing to say.
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Conforumist » Mon Dec 30, 2013 11:31 am

Our German friend always has a hard time with the word "ingredients". It always comes out indegrees. :)
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Watchman44 » Mon Dec 30, 2013 12:20 pm

We had lots of fun getting our Danish friends to try to say "Victorious vikings play vicious volley ball." It always sounded like "Wictorious Wikings play wishus wollyball"............ :whistle:
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Ghost » Mon Dec 30, 2013 12:31 pm

Ooh you cheeky little sea winkle
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Re: I Say, You Say... (Accents and quirks)

Postby Sister Jennifer » Mon Dec 30, 2013 11:31 pm

:D What a great sentence.

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