Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Bron H » Thu Jan 12, 2012 9:50 pm

I'm 14 so I guess it is classed as about my age group. These books are what first brought me into the world of terry pratchett and i think they are generaly as good as his adults books with maybe the first one being a little weaker. I havn't bought I SHALL WEAR MIDNIGHT because i havn't yet found it in paperback. Is it even out in paperback yet.
]HIM WHO MOUNTAIN CRUSH HIM NO
HIM WHO SUN STOP HIM NO
HIM WHO HAMMER HIM BREAK HIM NO
HIM WHO FIRE HIM FEAR HIM NO
HIM WHO RAISE HIM HEAD ABOVE HIM HEART
HIM DIAMOND
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Tonyblack » Thu Jan 12, 2012 10:21 pm

It certainly is in paperback. I bought my wife a rand new paperback copy for Christmas to save her reading the first edition hardback. She thought the paperback was so nice and pristine that she read the hardback again. :lol:

Welcome to the site, Bron H. :D
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Tiffany » Thu Jan 12, 2012 10:24 pm

Yes it is out in paperback now, Bron, saw it in a shop today.
Have you read The Amazing Maurice & His Educated Rodents yet? I have just finished reading it. It's very good.
Welcome to the forum.
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby ShadowNinjaCat » Fri Jan 13, 2012 9:00 am

Welcome to the forum,Bron H. :D
“We are all in the gutter,but some of us are looking at the stars.”- Oscar Wilde
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Natalya » Thu Apr 26, 2012 1:24 pm

From Russian TP's fan. :)
I have not Big Patience, that's why I already started read "WinterSmith" ( although I didn't finish of "Thud"!).... I do it sometimes, when I not reading "Thud"... :)
And I found that I no need dictionary now! ... well... Apart from 1-2 word per page! :) (in "Thud": when I started read - from 5 to 20 and 3-12 now plus meditation about some phrases (for right understanding) :)!).
PS Seriously: Unfortunately, books about Tiffany haven't translated in Russian yet:( Thats why I'll be able to talk about it only after have finish of reading 'WinterSmith' at least.
Best regards! :)
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Leewerrey » Sat Aug 24, 2013 8:40 am

Aw yes, we're poor Russians :cry: It's still impossible task to find books about Tiffany in bookshops because they haven't translated as yet, which is actually very strange because I saw the "Monstrous Regiment" a couple of days ago (though,with the title that was changed in a very wierd way definitely with the purpose to be more suitable for the Russian language) and I don't understand why there is no translation of "The Wee Free Men" though it was written earlier!
There are definitely some malicious snails in the ranks of our publishers... :think:
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Natalya » Fri Aug 30, 2013 7:07 am

Hi, Leewerrey :)
Glad to see you :)
Honestly, I think translation by Берденников Николай is the best. An I seriously think that man should translate man-author, and woman should translate woman-author. Because structure of man's and woman's minds is different in general!
Frankly, in spite of this, I'm going to translate TP's books when I'll retire on a pension ... :)
I know that it will possible because in Russia good translators don't hurry bring these excellent literature in the mass, alas!
Best regards! :)
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Who's Wee Dug » Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:30 pm

Maybe they (the translators) are having trouble with the Scottish dialect(language) words) in it from The Feegles even some of the English people do and they live here. :lol: :lol: :mrgreen:
He willnae tak' a drink! I think he's deid! , on the other hand though A Midgie in yir hand is worth twa up yir kilt.
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Natalya » Thu Oct 24, 2013 5:35 am

Oh, no, because we already have some books with The Feegles. Translation is enough good, indeed! :)
Best regards! :)
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby StuartHX » Fri Dec 06, 2013 7:55 pm

Interesting... but I haven't particularly noticed any difference in language and structure between the Tiffany Aching books and the rest of the Discworld novels... they are just part of the overall canon.

As someone has said, the only distinguishing feature is that the main protagonist is a child, which may well appeal to younger readers, but other than than that.... and, interestingly enough The Amazing Maurice... deals with some very dark issues which only really reappear in Thud.

But... Philip Pulman has also had this conundrum thrown at him. His Dark Materials deals with very adult issues even if his main characters are again children. If asked, why publish as a childrens' book his stock reply is.. the book is published, end of. And if it's published you can buy it and read it
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Slantaholic » Tue Dec 10, 2013 1:23 pm

I chose to delete my replies.

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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby pip » Tue Dec 10, 2013 2:10 pm

YA fiction deals with sex in many ways. Its one of the things that defines the genre.
And how is it subliminal :?: :?:
If you read it backwards is there a hidden message :?: :?:
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby Slantaholic » Tue Dec 10, 2013 7:53 pm

I chose to delete what the 15yo member of a reading group read subliminally into the books. And by subliminally, I mean, she read what was there and was not visible to everyone until she told us so.

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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby pip » Tue Dec 10, 2013 9:10 pm

Not to argue but I'd look up subliminal in a dictionary . if its obvious and the first thing perceived it ain't subliminal. Its more like a brick in the face
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Re: Are the Tiffany Books "Children's Books?"

Postby =Tamar » Wed Dec 11, 2013 9:50 am

Slantaholic wrote:" subliminal"

Because it's the first thing my '15yo' member mentioned.

As pip said, that's not subliminal. Subliminal is stuff you _don't_ notice.
It isn't even necessarily implied. I certainly didn't read it that way.

Slantaholic wrote: it sounded like: Mr Petty didn't like Amber's boyfriend, so he sent him back home, away from his pretty step-daughter, whom he raped and impregnated. Then he beat her, because she has always treated him like father and she behaved like a family member during that sex, not a pretty girl unrelated to him who was old enough (13) to have sh**ging lessons from him. He kept beating her because she wasn't appreciating the attention, and he couldn't give up because she was too pretty. The boyfriend couldn't rescue her being 13 and working elsewhere on dresses with his mum. Mr Seth Petty was guilty of domestic violence, beating and battering, and one day Amber had a miscarriage, which sometimes meant the father was unfit or so was the mother. It was linked to not complete infertility, but disease and 'curses'. The pub found out, knowing Petty was not the father.


I didn't read any incest in ISWM. "Nasty secrets" doesn't have to refer to that; it could refer to things like senile relatives being kept in the attic.

All I read was: 13-year-old Amber got pregnant by her 13-year-old boyfriend. That's very clear: Mr Petty's official objection was that Amber and 'that boy' were behaving scandalously. Petty, already drunk, beat her because he had apparently just found out she was pregnant. Meanwhile, Mrs Petty had run screaming and told the drunks at the pub, who decided that Mr Petty was going too far this time and decided to perform the traditional noisy announcement that they disapproved. (It's possible that they wouldn't have bothered to stop a "typical" beating, but that beating a pregnant girl was the tipping point. Petty seems to have been the last to suspect. If he had been responsible for it, he wouldn't have been the last to figure it out; he'd have been looking for the signs.)

Tiffany's father sent a lad to wake her up, and she got there first. The band of drunks would not have gone in the house to attack, but Tiffany knew that Petty would have gone outside and provoked an attack. She got him out of there to save the drunken villagers from becoming murderers. (Mr Aching was in the crowd, not expecting it to devolve into murderous violence but alert to the need to prevent it, so she was also saving him, though he had the sense to slip away and check the barn.)

While the drunks made noise around an empty house, Tiffany took care of the girl and talked to her father. After the drunks went away, Tiffany took Amber away. It's made clear that although Amber might not be Petty's daughter, she also might be, that in fact it was the uncertainty that was a continuing aggravation to him.

Later Petty sobered up enough to realize he had caused the death of the fetus, and may have caused the death of his daughter as well (though Tiffany had already taken her away, he didn't know that she was being taken care of); in a fit of drunken remorse, he attempted suicide. Tiffany saved him, as much for his attempt at an offering of flowers as for any other principle.

Slantaholic wrote:Yet some people can hear about domestic violence for a long time, seeing bruises, etc. and never react or tell authorities or heal/rescue the victim, etc.


Just as happened in the village in ISWM. They all knew about the bruises, but they didn't do anything.

Slantaholic wrote:A mob starts to 'kill' or punish Petty for injuring a pretty girl called Amber, who had a miscarriage after he beat her only. If he'd thrown her into a river or out of a window, most men would want to rescue her (like firefighters) and would start a group (like how unions form in clumps).


Are you describing the centuries-ago customs paralleled in ISWM or modern "real" "true-ish" men? The mob in ISWM did not originally intend to kill Petty. A few hotheads were talking big but the others would keep them under control as long as they didn't actually encounter him, according to Mr Aching. So they really only went to make a lot of noise and give him notice that he was disapproved of. Possibly he would have trouble getting help in future, or would have to pay cash at the pub. The group - "mob" - might have rescued her if they'd actually arrived in time to do anything for her, but even by the time Tiffany got there, Petty had finished the beating and gone to bed, leaving Amber unconscious in the barn.

Slantaholic wrote:They arrive and find Amber missing. Tiffany has her somewhere safe. Most men peel off, and think about marrying the pretty Amber later (even at 13), and looking after her from her vicious father.


Huh? They didn't pay any attention to Amber. They were yelling around the empty house while Tiffany and Amber were still in the barn. Only Mr Aching bothered to check the barn.
The only person who wanted to marry Amber was her boyfriend.

Slantaholic wrote:So ISWM is... odd about true-ish men behaviour.


We seem to have read different books.
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