Vimes in movie

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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby pip » Wed Aug 07, 2013 12:01 pm

Controversial to say the least. Probably a bit too old now. I still find it hard to see past Charles Dance to be honest
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby michelanCello » Fri Aug 09, 2013 3:54 pm

pip wrote:Controversial to say the least. Probably a bit too old now. I still find it hard to see past Charles Dance to be honest

I liked him very much too, and every time I see him in a movie I can't help thinking look, there's Vetinari!
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby Dotsie » Fri Aug 09, 2013 5:38 pm

I hate to disagree so vehemently with a newbie, but I think Morgan Freeman would be a terrible choice for the role. He's good at being Morgan Freeman though...
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby Who's Wee Dug » Fri Aug 09, 2013 6:42 pm

I agree Dotsie plus he has only one hand to use, I think the other was crippled in a stroke or suchwise that is why he wears a glove on it, you never it or the two in any film sequence, so he is not suitable as a candidate.
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby raptornx01 » Sat Aug 10, 2013 3:43 am

I could see freeman as vetinari. he can at times have that cold calculating look.

for the comments at about vimes and American Vs English. to be honest, why does he have HAVE to be english at all? it for one, being a fantasy world, and two, it's not like the arguments about a character who was black, or asian being played by a white guy or someone else.

I doubt you'd see as much of a hardline stance to make sure Angua sounds like she comes from Louisiana. not that Cajun Angua is a bad idea :D

Anyway. I second the Chris Eccleston vote. I think he would work very well as Vimes.
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby DreadfulKata » Wed Sep 25, 2013 2:03 am

raptornx01 wrote:for the comments at about Vimes and American Vs English. to be honest, why does he have HAVE to be English at all? it for one, being a fantasy world, and two, it's not like the arguments about a character who was black, or asian being played by a white guy or someone else.


For me it's essential that the Discworld have an English accent (okay, not in BangBangDuck or Howandaland, but you know what I mean). It's true that it's pure fantasy. But the tone of the narration is so British and the characters are written with such an English accent (or rather range of British accents) that to have an American accent in an adaptation just seems utterly bizarre. To me it would sound as weird as having American characters in Lord Of the Rings.

And I think it changes the essential tone of the thing: for instance, an American Vimes becomes too slick, too Marlowe-esque.It reminds me of when they talked about making an American version of Spaced a few years ago (you can see clips of the pilot online). IT wasn't a bad attempt, but there was something fundamental to the show in its Britishness: it was a response to all those slick American shows like Friends. The joke was these big Hollywood tropes playing out in a grubby North London flat. Once you move the show to America, it loses that whole juxtaposition.

The default accent for fantasy is English (even where the author is American, see Game Of Thrones) and the reason, I think, is partly because British history often makes up a lot of the source material, and also the fact that these fantasy worlds are clearly analogous to a time before there WAS an American accent because Europe hadn't 'discovered' the Americas yet. Thereby American accents sound a bit too 'modern' to our ears... It's just one of those things: futuristic science fiction has an American accent, historical fantasy has an English accent :)

For instance, Marc Warren's Michael-Jackson-via-Johnnny-Depp's-Willy-Wonka accent always sounded a little out of place in the Hogfather adaptation. I think a consistency with the accents helps to ground the setting and make it feel more real.
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby Dotsie » Wed Sep 25, 2013 1:35 pm

Well, he's a cockney in the books for sure. He's AM born and bred, and when Ridcully talks to a street urchin in UA, the boy pronounces 'half past' as 'arp arsed' - definite cockney. In the films, I don't think it would really matter, except that he's ours and we'd all get really upset :P :mrgreen: There's never been a Robin Hood with a decent accent, and don't we all love complaining about it! :lol:
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby raisindot » Wed Sep 25, 2013 3:35 pm

The actors have to be British (or speak with English or UK accents, anyway). Well, except for the Uberwaldians, who'd have to speak in "Nazi English" and the Klatchians, who'd have to speak in "Arab terrorist English."

The Britishness is what makes it work. I mean, can you imagine the characters in True Bood speaking with British accents? Heck, can you even imagine any actor from the UK or Australia or New Zealand playing any of the True Blood characters with an American accent...oh, wait....
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby Who's Wee Dug » Wed Sep 25, 2013 8:24 pm

The Londoner Andrew Lincoln who plays the sheriff in the Walking Dead. ;)
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby Dotsie » Thu Sep 26, 2013 6:29 am

The thing is, accents in the UK vary with every few miles, so a fake accent is too easy to spot and then all we do is whine about it :oops: I liked Gwyneth Paltrow's English accent though. I never hear anyone complaining about Andrew Lincoln or Hugh Laurie, is the American accent easier to do? I heard Eric Bana say that his Australian accent got slated in his own country, by a reviewer who thought he was American :lol:
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby raisindot » Thu Sep 26, 2013 1:49 pm

[quote="Dotsie"I never hear anyone complaining about Andrew Lincoln or Hugh Laurie, is the American accent easier to do? [/quote]

There really isn't one "American" accent either. Accents can vary widely within a 200 mile range (just ask anyone who's ever traveling from Brooklyn to Boston). Even the southern accent has many variations, even though they're not as easy to pick up.

What most English people might call the "American accent" is the very neutral midwest accent, which doesn't have huge vowel inflections. Think of Johnny Carson or George Clooney and you pretty much have it.

Hugh Laurie's American accent (and most British actors playing Americans) aspire to this midwest accent. Domenic West's Baltimore accent on The Wire was amazing, as was Idris Elba's African American accent on the same show.

Some actors can't do it all. Bob Hoskins in Who Framed Roger Rabbit couldn't do it. I doubt that Michael Caine could do an American accent even if a gun was held to his head.

The only American actor besides Paltrow (who I believe spent a great deal of her life in Britain) who I've seen doing a great British accent is Peter Dinklage on Game of Thrones. I had absolutely no idea he wasn't British until I saw his Emmy acceptance speech.
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby DreadfulKata » Sat Sep 28, 2013 5:11 pm

:D While I adore Peter Dinklage's performance, his accent on Game Of Thrones is NOT convincingly English! I don't mind it because his accent is at least consistent (he's not American one minute and English the next, all his lines are spoken in the same accent).

We're not talking Dick Van Dyke or that-bit-in-Firefly-whenSummer-Glau-does-a-'cockney'-accent-levels-of-bad, but it's certainly not the RP he was going for.


RE. Vimes: personally, I've always imagined him with a slightly Northern accent - slightly Mancunian or Leeds-ian (perhaps just because of his bluff working class-ness). Not very pronounced, just a slight Northerness around the vowels :)
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby Dotsie » Sat Sep 28, 2013 6:33 pm

Northerners = working class? :think: I take it your not from the north yourself? Not really offended, but I wouldn't mind knowing how southerners earn a living.
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby DreadfulKata » Sat Sep 28, 2013 10:11 pm

No, my family is (they're Northumbrians) but I was born and bred in Brighton and it doesn't get much more southern than that!). Naturally I don't think Northerners have any less range of class than Southeners, or that a non-RP accent indicates any particular class.

What I meant (and should have said better) is that I associate Vimes' tough, working class persona with a particular kind of tough, working class, northern persona: that 'in my day we washed the steps with our tongues and were grateful for the meal' stereotype.'. Whether northern or southern sounding I definitely imagine Vimes sounding working class.

Certainly didn't mean to imply that Northern/working class were interchangable ideas!
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Re: Vimes in movie

Postby Sister Jennifer » Fri Oct 04, 2013 10:08 pm

Who's Wee Dug wrote:The Londoner Andrew Lincoln who plays the sheriff in the Walking Dead. ;)

And the Governor in S3 is an Englishman.


Dotsie wrote: I heard Eric Bana say that his Australian accent got slated in his own country, by a reviewer who thought he was American :lol:

That's pretty funny.
I wonder when he started sounding American? ;) Some early Eric Bana :D


Beside the more well known ie, London cockney, or west country Hobbits, I wouldn't know what part of England someone was from by their dialect or accent. I will say one thing, I don't care where the actor is from but DW characters have got to sound UKian.
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