The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby Jan Van Quirm » Fri Apr 05, 2013 4:07 pm

Quatermass wrote:"Convos"? You're turning Australian. I dunno whether to be pleased or scared. :?

As if! :roll: Convos been around for yonks in the UK although we might have been contaminated by Neighbours or Home & Away... :shifty: More than likely though it's since mobiles/texting caught on :snooty:
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby Quatermass » Fri Apr 05, 2013 11:02 pm

Jan Van Quirm wrote:
Quatermass wrote:"Convos"? You're turning Australian. I dunno whether to be pleased or scared. :?

As if! :roll: Convos been around for yonks in the UK although we might have been contaminated by Neighbours or Home & Away... :shifty: More than likely though it's since mobiles/texting caught on :snooty:


Contaminated by Home and A Wangst*? Or Neighbours (Pick Your Nose and Eat the Flavours**)? Contaminated by Aussie soaps? :shock: :o

*One of two personal and unflattering names I have for Home and Away. My personal favourite, I have declined to use here, as it uses a popular expletive.

**That's how I mocked the theme song. I think I learned that from school, though.
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby Who's Wee Dug » Mon Apr 29, 2013 12:33 pm

Feegled from Jason's Discword Monthly, for those who don't subscribe.

The new Terry Pratchett First Novel Award Shortlist has been announced, the six best stories have been selected from over 500 entries.

The shortlist entries in title order are:

A Kill in the Morning by Graeme Shimmin
Bloodline by Sophie Constable
The Hive by Alexander Maskill
The Shadows of Annwn by Catherine Whittle The Unspoken Death of the Amazing Flying Boy by Jean Burdett The Way Through the Woods by Robin Pearson

The six books will be discussed by the judging panel which includes Sir Terry Pratchett, Rob Wilkins, Editorial Director Simon Taylor, Publicist Lynsey Dalladay and Alex Veasey from The Forbidden Planet.

A winner will be announced on the 31st May. The winning entry will receive a 20,000 GBP prize as an advance on a publishing contract.
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby Quatermass » Wed May 01, 2013 9:27 am

This was already posted on the TP Website. Seriously, the shortlist is still the first news item (as of this post, anyway).

Anyway, I did some editing to my novel, and I have sent it to three publishers so far. I should know in the next couple of weeks whether or not two of them even want to go further with it.
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby Jan Van Quirm » Wed May 01, 2013 12:31 pm

Good luck with that Q - I've sent off to 3 literary agents and heard back almost immediately from one (on email) to say that they're swamped and wouldn't be taking it any further with me. :evil: They're big on childrens' titles anyway so I guess I made a duff choice although they said they were looking to move more into 'innovative' adult fiction - I guess I just found out what that means... :roll:
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby Quatermass » Fri May 03, 2013 10:30 am

Well, not only am I sending my book around to various publishers, but I have another book for another prize.

This competition requires a fee to enter. But it's not only one of the more prestigious awards in Australia, but it's hosted by a well-known and reputable company. It's the Vogel Literary Award, hosted by Allen and Unwin and funded by the most prestigious newspaper in Australia, The Australian.

http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=442

http://www.allenandunwin.com/default.aspx?page=443

Now, I can't use my TP Prize book for this, as it is under consideration by publishers, including Allen and Unwin. But, I do have one other novel I can use. It's a bit of a risk, but I have no other completed novels, and I have until the end of May to do it. Better to polish an existing work than work on any that aren't complete. So, the pressure's on...

Sorry to hear about your rejections, Jan. Although at least you'll get them: the publishers I've sent my novel to (Allen and Unwin, Penguin, and Hachette Australia) say that they'll only reply if they actually like your work. :roll:
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby Jan Van Quirm » Fri May 03, 2013 12:02 pm

Q wrote:Sorry to hear about your rejections, Jan. Although at least you'll get them: the publishers I've sent my novel to (Allen and Unwin, Penguin, and Hachette Australia) say that they'll only reply if they actually like your work.


That's the norm here as well Q - and why I chose to send to those 3 agents first off as 2 of them guaranteed a reply (and the other had an agent who's from S. Africa and published herself) and took samples by email rather than postal. :roll: Most of the agents/publishers (those who actually take submissions which are few and far between) ask for the 1st 3 chapters for fiction or 3 of the 'strongest' ones for non-fiction which at least saves on postage for surface submissions but it's expensive even so. Agents will tend to reply in brief at least but all the publishers here will only respond if they're seriously interested so most of the time you're just left hanging - gits! :x

Allen and Unwin are a venerable outfit as their British arm (just Unwin then I think) published Tolkien pre-war up until he died more or less - before they got swallowed up by Harper Collins anyway :)
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby pip » Fri May 03, 2013 12:49 pm

An interesting extract from Hugh Howeys Blog . He is one of the growing number of highly successful self publishers -

Last week, fully half of the top 10 bestselling ebooks were self-published. There’s an interesting story on Forbes about this trend, as well as a link to Digital Book World’s analysis.

At this year’s Digital Book World conference in New York, my agent and I were invited on stage to talk about the benefits of hybrid publishing. What seemed a neologism then feels old-hat now. And the number of authors moving from traditional to self and from self to traditional is blurring the distinction between the two. Interestingly, with the commercial success of so many self-published authors, the advice that was mocked a year ago is now being bandied about like a truism: Take control of your publishing future. Do not be afraid of getting your work in the hands of the reader. Ignore the sages of old and listen to your gut. And keep writing.
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby raisindot » Fri May 03, 2013 1:05 pm

pip wrote:An interesting extract from Hugh Howeys Blog . He is one of the growing number of highly successful self publishers -

Last week, fully half of the top 10 bestselling ebooks were self-published. There’s an interesting story on Forbes about this trend, as well as a link to Digital Book World’s analysis.

At this year’s Digital Book World conference in New York, my agent and I were invited on stage to talk about the benefits of hybrid publishing. What seemed a neologism then feels old-hat now. And the number of authors moving from traditional to self and from self to traditional is blurring the distinction between the two. Interestingly, with the commercial success of so many self-published authors, the advice that was mocked a year ago is now being bandied about like a truism: Take control of your publishing future. Do not be afraid of getting your work in the hands of the reader. Ignore the sages of old and listen to your gut. And keep writing.


I agree with this totally. Originally, I sent a proposal and sample chapters of my novel to 40 publishers and 25 agents who SAID they would receive material from new novelists.

Of these, only 14 publishers and 9 agents even responded.

Of the 6 publishers and 7 agents who were willing to discuss moving forward with the book, here was the gist of some of their comments:

"Can you move the setting from Oklahoma to New York City? No wants wants to read about characters in rural towns."

"Can you move the date from 1989 to the present, and have the main character [a teenage girl] have a Facebook page and tweet?"

"Can you add more sex scenes to the book, especially with the teenager? The Twilight series had made teenage sex books very popular."

"Congratulations! We' can tentative put your book on our publication list for 2015. Please reserve six months of 2015 to go on a book tour. You will be expected to make your own travel arrangements."

"There's far too many scenes with the male protagonist. Could you eliminate him without changing the story?"

"Your book is far too critical of right-wing Christian hate groups and militia. We'd like you to change these groups to Islamic terrorist groups."

Hell with that. I'm self-publishing it as a Kindle book. If demand is strong, I'll make it print to order. In this day and age, why rely on a publisher, who will make you jump through hoops and sell your soul? The only value (besides editing) that they can offer is publicity and reviews from established source, which any author these days can duplicate through ingenious use of social media.

Book publishers, like newspapers, are slowly going the way of the dodo bird. Even today e-book sales outnumber printed book sales and book shops are closing down by the score. Now, I'm not a fan of e-books in general and I love bookshops, but the 'writing' is on the e-wall. Authors have never had more freedom to control their own destiny.
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby pip » Fri May 03, 2013 1:10 pm

Times have changed in publishing and the power is shifting to the writer by the look of things so good luck Raisin.
Self publishing is definitely not the dead end we were led to believe
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby Tonyblack » Fri May 03, 2013 1:11 pm

:lol: Reminds me of the comment that Tony Hillerman, the writer of a highly successful crime series set on the Navajo Reservation and starring two Navajo cops, was told by a literary agent. "Great story, but can you lose the Indians?" :lol:
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby Tonyblack » Fri May 03, 2013 1:12 pm

pip wrote:Times have changed in publishing and the power is shifting to the writer by the look of things so good luck Raisin.
Self publishing is definitely not the dead end we were led to believe

Yes, but I suspect that it's going to mean a lot more Kindle books rather than "real" books. It's probably also going to mean a hell of a lot more crap being published.
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby pip » Fri May 03, 2013 1:14 pm

I know of two aspiring writers who set books in Dublin and were told to relocate the story to London where neither of them had ever been. One did and the book was still refused :roll:
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby pip » Fri May 03, 2013 1:15 pm

Tonyblack wrote:
pip wrote:Times have changed in publishing and the power is shifting to the writer by the look of things so good luck Raisin.
Self publishing is definitely not the dead end we were led to believe

Yes, but I suspect that it's going to mean a lot more Kindle books rather than "real" books. It's probably also going to mean a hell of a lot more crap being published.

To be fair publishers have output a lot of crap of there own. If self publishing gets a good author going it can't be a bad thing. Sadly there is the ebook side of things but most of the successful self published works have then come out as real books. :D
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Re: The Terry Pratchett Prize, Round Two...

Postby raisindot » Fri May 03, 2013 1:55 pm

Tonyblack wrote::lol: Reminds me of the comment that Tony Hillerman, the writer of a highly successful crime series set on the Navajo Reservation and starring two Navajo cops, was told by a literary agent. "Great story, but can you lose the Indians?" :lol:


:D

Of course, one of the main problems with Hillerman is that his agent and publisher allowed him to sully his once-stellar literary reputation by continuing to publish Leaphorn/Chee books long after his narrative wick had run out of candle to burn. And, as far as I know, while he was still publishing Hillerman never suffered from the kind of physiological challenges that Pterry struggles with today. He just couldn't write anything good anymore, which is inevitable with just about every author in the twilight of their career.
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