Is Discworld the best?

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Postby Dotsie » Thu Sep 29, 2011 9:13 am

I've read a couple of Rankins (they were good, but I don't seem to have got hooked), and about 10 of Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum series, but they're mostly the same book. Harry Potter was good, as were most of the Thursday Next books. But the DW series is almost always very entertaining, so it's definitely my favourite.
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Postby feanor » Thu Sep 29, 2011 11:04 am

Ayup Author3...

It depends I think on what you want from a book, and what you expose yourself to. I LOVE HH for Arthurs Englishness, stupidity, Incredulity and world-weary Sarcasm. I loveTolkien for the whole Damn scope of his Mythos, I love Clive Cussler for Dirk Pitts Historical adventures, and the premises behind them, Leslie Thomas (Virgin Soldiers, etc) for his amazing Stories. I love DW (and Truckers, DSOTS, Maurice etc) for their Worlds themselves, the puns, the Daft Characters, the amazingly named characters, The Librarian, Rincewind, Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, Teppic, Carrot, Nobby, Brutha, Twoflower, Death, and the mild swearing in the right places that makes me laugh until my sides ache. PLUS the loads of Killer one-Liner putdowns and phrases that NONE of my 'Unread' Idiot friends have ever heard of...
I'm glad that all my problems have now Resolved down to where my next Banana is coming from...
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Postby ChristianBecker » Thu Sep 29, 2011 12:01 pm

My girlfriend isn't a huge TP fan (yet), but she's reading Reaper Man at the moment.
Yesterday she suddenly read out to me: ".. were the future flows into the past through the pinch of the now..." and was amazed at this beautiful wording.

This is but one example. Pratchett's work is full of those gems. This is, apart from the humour, one thing I appreciate very much.
On with their heads! I'm the clown prince of fools
if you don't get the joke it's your loss
Love and laughter you see are the new currency
'cause greed's coinage is not worth a toss

Exile yourself to the unforgiving continent of Wraeclast!
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Postby pip » Thu Sep 29, 2011 1:01 pm

anyone i've gotten to read Terry finds something new . He writes on so many levels and uses such a wide knowledge base.
I've found many Anthropology references which are lost on others but i'm sure theres a lot of subtle references i miss. THats the genius of the man. The books keep giving :D
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Postby Australis » Sat Oct 22, 2011 1:58 pm

Aside from Discworld... hmmm. let me have a quick look on my bookshelf.

One of Terry's favourite authors is George MacDonald Fraser, one of mine too,. The Flashman Papers are really good.

Over the last couple of years I've found the Shardlake books by CJ Sansom. Great historical stuff.

In my spotty teens I discovered the Lensman series for SF, and the Eternal Champion as well as the Conan series for fantasy.

And finally only a trilogy, but a good one, Dream Park, The Barsoom Project, and The California Voodoo Game, by Larry Niven and Steven Barnes.
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Postby high eight » Wed Nov 02, 2011 12:40 am

Australis wrote:Aside from Discworld... hmmm. let me have a quick look on my bookshelf.

One of Terry's favourite authors is George MacDonald Fraser, one of mine too,. The Flashman Papers are really good.

Over the last couple of years I've found the Shardlake books by CJ Sansom. Great historical stuff.

In my spotty teens I discovered the Lensman series for SF, and the Eternal Champion as well as the Conan series for fantasy.

And finally only a trilogy, but a good one, Dream Park, The Barsoom Project, and The California Voodoo Game, by Larry Niven and Steven Barnes.


I'll go along with Flashman and pretty much anything by George Macdonald Fraser (His McAuslan stories are hilarious looks at a more modern military idiot).

Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey-Maturin stories. The best Napoleonic sea stories I've ever read and close to the best historical novels full stop.

Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next stories.

Robert Rankin's Brentford Trilogy (up to eight volumes and counting......)
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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Wed Nov 02, 2011 1:01 pm

Penfold wrote:
Who's Wee Dug wrote:That's what got me to buy the book those many years ago, as soon as I seen that passage about the two unsavoury rogues it made me laugh, I then put it back on the shelf because it had a tiny tear in the dust jacket and it was the last one. :cry:

I think it may have been that passage that got me hooked, together with the Lovecraft references. It takes a great deal of skill to take the micky like that without giving offence to fans of those books (LotR fans vs. Bored of the Rings, anyone?). :wink:

Most LotR fans I know Image Bored of the Rings - my copy's almost falling to bits...

I can't name my favourite series even by genre (Discworld and Tolkien's books) because really I like them for different reasons and the comparison is therefore compromised.

I adore Discworld for Terry's humour, satire and parody (no matter what he's writing about) and sheer variety, 'draw in' factor and 'nose' for a cracking yarn. Characterisation is also mostly excellent with a memorable cast to draw on and interweave as they grow with the cumulative word count. :D

Tolkien - also the 'draw in' factor but in his case it's because of the sheer depth and breadth of scope of his various writings beyond TH and LotR in which he's created viable cultures, history and language and then gone on 'colouring in' with more detail and just exquisite writing that does have humour and morality and - in this he definitely exceeds Terry - consistent myth and magic (as I've been saying in the Snuff threads the magic in Discworld is definitely consigned to the background, especially in the AM influenced books).

Other series are, for the classics, Jane Austen and her visionary chick-lit :shock: :twisted: The woman was nothing short of brilliant, no question about it; truly wise and funny with it and her characterisation was sublime and always plausible (something that Tolks and Terry fall down on sometimes). :P

Finally another SF&F writer who's extremely underrated and manages to pull off what seems impossible with sci-fi and fantasy fusion in her series The Saga of the Exiles and it's follow-up stand-alone Intervention and sequel trilogy The Galactic Milieu. Again good characterisation, humour and compassion with a strong dash of realism in terms of the infirm nature of the human beast and, most importantly, extremely inspired research skills. Anyone who can write almost seamlessly about folklore, time travel, prehistoric geology, aliens, psychic powers, sentient inter-Galactic 'Ship' creatures, Arthurian and Celtic legend and genetics and pull off a fully rational, always coherent, engaging and exciting storyline over a 6 million year timespan has to be brilliant in anyone's book surely? :lol:

I can't choose between them because what they all do with their storytelling is to 'take me' as in take me into the tale so I'm fully engaged with plot and characters, identifying with them and the environments and situations whilst all being different in their approach and technique. They're all my favourites but for different reasons and therefore they're all incomparable. :D
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Wed Nov 02, 2011 2:04 pm

Bored of the Rings! excellent book the start of it cracked me up, it was the hairy toes. :lol:
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Postby Penfold » Wed Nov 02, 2011 5:27 pm

I really enjoyed Bored of the Rings as well but at the time I remember an awful lot of my friends were up in arms about it. :lol:
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Wed Nov 02, 2011 5:36 pm

Just like some people do with the Discworld books. :lol:
He willnae tak' a drink! I think he's deid! , on the other hand though A Midgie in yir hand is worth twa up yir kilt.
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Postby high eight » Wed Nov 02, 2011 6:27 pm

Who's Wee Dug wrote:Just like some people do with the Discworld books. :lol:


If we're talking Tolkien parodies, I liked Hordes of the Things on the Beeb http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hordes_of_the_Things_%28radio_series%29
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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Wed Nov 02, 2011 6:40 pm

Hordes of the Things was brill! Michael Hordern was much better as Radox the Green than as Gandalf in the truly awful cartoon LotR :D
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Postby author3 » Wed Nov 02, 2011 7:06 pm

Jan if your referring to the 197? animated cartoon
Ten i agree it was awful
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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Wed Nov 02, 2011 9:05 pm

Yeah - the Ralph Bakshi one. The animation was groundbreaking for its day (anticipating CGI in some ways with live action footage incorporated into the animation) but the casting and characterisation was very 'of it's time' and unless its Bored of the Rings psychodelia with nobby Eton accents (except for the guy who voiced Sam whose bumpkin was far worse than Sean Astin ever managed even :shock: ) it ain't doing it for anyone... :lol:
Last edited by Jan Van Quirm on Wed Nov 02, 2011 10:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Wed Nov 02, 2011 10:36 pm

The animation was called rotoscoping he also done one called Wizards.

I might have to look that out,( Hordes of the Things ) thanks for that High Eight. :)
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