Names of Characters in Foreign Editions.

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Postby Anilori » Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:29 pm

Mr Couton is a very clever man, every French Discworld fan will tell you we're really happy to have him! He's also very nice and funny in person :)

I just noticed I had forgotten the last part of the list, with the YA books' titles:

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The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents -> Le fabuleux Maurice et ses rongeurs savants (literal translation, nothing to remark upon)

- The Wee Free Men -> Les Ch'tits hommes libres -> A literal and beautifully faithful translation, since "ch'tit", like "wee", is a dialectal word meaning "little" (the French Feegles speak in Northern dialect). More than that, it's the word that symbolises the whole Nord culture: people from the region are called "Ch'tis" and their speech, "ch'ti" - so they're not only "ch'tits hommes libres", they're "Ch'ti (-speaking) hommes libres"^^

(A little while ago, there was this film called " Bienvenue chez les Ch'tis" that turned out to be the most successful film ever in France. It even sank Titanic! It was a feel-good comedy about a man from the South moving to the grim, bleak north [think Ken Loach film with chips and mussels] and finding unexpected warmth and friendship there. Heard of it abroad?)

- A Hat Full of Sky and Wintersmith -> Un Chapeau de Ciel and L'Hiverrier (literal translations)
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Mon Jun 06, 2011 5:09 pm

He willnae tak' a drink! I think he's deid! , on the other hand though A Midgie in yir hand is worth twa up yir kilt.
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Postby Tonyblack » Mon Jun 06, 2011 5:44 pm

Teppic wrote:Superb post, well done.

I like them all except for this one:

Agnes Nitt -> Agnès Créttine (crétin, -e: idiot, nitwit)

I really don't think that suits the character. She is a sensible, intelligent and down-to-earth character, able to 'cope' and rarely panicked.

She's almost, I'd say, the complete opposite of an idiot or a nitwit (a description more suited to some of the senile wizards, Nobby or Lord Rust).

I suspect "Nitt" was chosen because it sounds dull, monosyllabic, and a little witch like. There's nothing you can do with a boring name like Nitt; it is what it is. That, of course, is in contrast to Perdita X Dream, her other personality's "name".
It has always been my suspicion that Agnes Nitt was a reference to one of the Pendle Witches, whose name was Alice Nutter. It's not used so much these days, but calling someone a 'Nit' was another way of saying they were a bit of an idiot.

This also ties in somewhat with Good Omens, where the book of prophesies is written by an Agnes Nutter. I'm sure that Terry was aware of the Pendle Witches as Good Omens also contains a character named Anathema Device. One of the Pendle Witches was named Alizon Device.

So the name Agnès Créttine would actually fit for Agnes Nitt. :D
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Postby Doughnut Jimmy » Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:07 pm

Anilori wrote:- Cut-Me-Own-Throat-Dibbler -> Planteur-je-m'tranche-la-gorge (the "cut-my-own-throat" part is literally translated, but I really don't know about "Planteur", which means, well, planter...)


Well a Dibber (note no L) is a stick for planting with so maybe that's the connection?
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Postby Tonyblack » Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:10 pm

Doughnut Jimmy wrote:
Anilori wrote:- Cut-Me-Own-Throat-Dibbler -> Planteur-je-m'tranche-la-gorge (the "cut-my-own-throat" part is literally translated, but I really don't know about "Planteur", which means, well, planter...)


Well a Dibber (note no L) is a stick for planting with so maybe that's the connection?
According to an online dictionary, a dibble (with the L) is also a stick for planting with. :wink:
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Postby Doughnut Jimmy » Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:19 pm

Interesting Tony, a case of pick your own spelling perhaps?

A Dibbler is apparently a small marsupial.
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Postby author3 » Mon Jun 06, 2011 7:22 pm

There could be millions of meanings :?
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Swedish translations

Postby NightWatch » Sat Jun 11, 2011 8:22 pm

... allow me to do this again, as there have been a few books (and characters, quite possibly) since the last translation offered. Titles and characters are taken from Wikipedia, while the translations enclosed within { and } symbols are my translations from Swedish into English (if necessary). Any other notes will be in parenthesis below the entry.

Novels:
The Colour of Magic - Magins färg - { The Magic's Colour }
The Light Fantastic - Det Fantastiska Ljuset - { The Fantastic Light }
Equal Rites - Trollkarlens stav - { The Wizard's Staff }
Mort - Mort - { --- }
Sourcery - Svartkonster - { "Black Magic" or possibly "The Dark Arts" }
Wyrd Sisters - Häxkonster - { "Witchcraft" or more literally "Witches' Art" }
Pyramids - Pyramidfeber - { Pyramid Fever }
(This is possibly a pun on the translation of 1925 Charlie Chaplin movie "The Gold Rush", the title of which is translated as "Guldfeber" - Gold Fever)
Guards! Guards! - I lagens namn - { In the Name of the Law }
--Faust-- Eric - Eric - { --- }
Moving Pictures - Rörliga bilder - { --- }
Reaper Man - Döden ligger lågt - { Death Lies Low }
Witches Abroad - Häxor i faggorna - { Witches About }
(This is actually a very good translation where the pun of the term "abroad" is unfortunately lost, but still conveys the general meaning of the original title.)
Small Gods - Små gudar - { --- }
Lords and Ladies - Herrskap och häxor - { Nobles and Witches }
(In Swedish, "herrskap" can refer either to a married couple or to the upper classes; "Lords and Ladies" therefore are both included in the term, so an educated guess here is that the "witches"-part was added for, for lack of a better term, clarification.)
Men at Arms - En man på sin vakt - { A Man on (His) Guard }
Soul Music - Levande musik - { Living Music }
(In Swedish, this is also a rather sad pun. The term "levande" in this context can also mean, translated to English, "live", as in "Live from Johannesburg: The Trent Brothers!". So another possible translation would be "Live Music", but it doesn't quite hit the mark.)
Interesting Times - Spännande tider - { Exciting Times }
(Of course, something that is exciting is also interesting; thus the translation. The literal term for the translation of "interesting" only pertains to curiosity, not to excietement.)
Maskerade - Masker - { Masks }
Feet of Clay - På lerfötter - { On Clay Feet }
(In Swedish, the idiom "a giant on clay feet" refers to something large, like an organization, that has a very shaky foundation. Thus the pun. I assume it is the same in English?)
Hogfather - Svinvinternatt - { Hog-Winter Night }
(A "svinvinter", literally hog-winter or swine-winter, is an extremely cold and harsh winter, with little to eat and too much snow for comfort. The translation doesn't quite do the term justice; with some interpretation, the title could be translated to "A Freezing Winter Night".)
Jingo - Jingo - { --- }
The Last Continent - Den sista kontinenten - { --- }
Carpe Jugulum - Carpe Jugulum - { --- }
The Fifth Elephant - No official translation yet - { Den Femte Elefanten }
The Truth - No official translation yet - { Sanningen }
Thief of Time - No official translation yet - { Tidstjuven }
The Last Hero - No official translation yet - { Den Siste Hjälten }
The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents - Den Makalöse Maurice och hans Kultiverade Gnagare - { The Marvellous Maurice and His Cultivated Rodents }
(Another pun, I'm afraid, by the translator. "Kultiverade", translating to "cultivated" is of course a play on words, alluding that these rats were trained or "grown" for a purpose (as in cultivating crops), but also that they have achieved a level of cultural knowledge and a culture of their own. And education, of sorts, I suppose.)
Night Watch - No official translation yet - { Nattvakten }
The Wee Free Men - Små blå män - { Tiny Blue Men }
(Some claim that it's "Small Blue Men", but the word "tiny" is the one implied in the word "små", not "small". "Tiny" is the proper word, as it is to do with physical size.)
Monstrous Regiment - No official translation yet - { Det Monstruösa Regimentet }
A Hat Full of Sky - No official translation yet - { En Hatt Full Av Himmel }
Going Postal - No official translation yet - { Postiljonären }
(There is no phrase that properly translates "going postal", so I made a bad pun myself - the translation is constructed of two parts - "postiljon" which is a rather archaic word for "mail man" and "ären", which - when added to the former - is a play on words for the word "the millionaire", which is "miljonären". Of course this is just a scam.)
Thud! - No official translation yet - { Tjong! }
Wintersmith - No official translation yet - { Vintersmeden }
Making money - No official translation yet - { Att Göra Pengar }
(This is a bit of a tough nut to crack, as there is no corresponding homonymic term to "making money" (indicating both the production of and earning of money). I would say that something along the lines of "Penningpress" would be a decent choice for a translation (indicating both "to be under financial pressure, i.e. poor" and "a mint".)
Unseen Academicals - No official translation yet - { Osynliga Akademikerna }
("Unseen University" is translated to "Osynliga Universitetet", which is actually rather translated into "The Invisible University", but I digress.)
I Shall Wear Midnight - No official translation yet - { Jag Skall Bära Midnatt }
Snuff - No official translation yet - { --- }

Characters:
SWEDISH NAME. { ENGLISH NAME, if applicable }

Agnes Nitt, a.k.a. Perdita. { --- }
Albert, or Alberto Malich. { --- }
Angua, or Delphine Angua von Überwald. { --- }
Bagaget. { The Luggage }
Bibliotekarien. { The Librarian }
Binky. { --- }
Blinde Io. { Blind Io }
Bravd Navländaren. { Bravd the Hublander }
Brutha. { --- }
Casanunda. { --- }
Cohen Barbaren, or Djingis Cohen. { Cohen the Barbarian }
Conina. { --- }
Cuddy. { --- }
D.B.M.R Dribbler, or Det-Blir-Min-Ruin Dribbler. { C.M.O.T Dibbler, or Cut-Me-Own-Throat Dibbler }
Detritus. { --- }
Dorfl. { --- }
Döden. { Death }
Esmerelda "Mormor" Vädervax. { Esemerelda "Granny" Weatherwax }
Grisefar. { The Hogfather }
Gråbo. { Greebo }
Gytha "Nanna" Ogg. { Gytha "Nanny" Ogg }
Havelock Vetinari. { --- }
Hrun Barbaren. { Hrun the Barbarian }
Leonard av Quirm. { Leonard of Quirm }
Morot. { Carrot }
Nobby Nobbs, or Cecil Wormsborough St. John Nobbs. { --- }
Pundhuvudet Johannessen. { Bloody Stupid Johnson }
Rensvind. { Rincewind }
Råttornas Död. { The Death of Rats }
Store A'Tuin. { Great A'Tuin }
Susan, or Susan Sto Helit. { --- }
Svarta Aliss. { Black Aliss }
Sybil Ramkin, or Lady Sybil Deidre Olgivanna Ramkin. { --- }
Teppic, or Teppicymon XXVIII. { --- }
Tiffany Aching. { --- }
Tvåblomster. { Twoflower }
Samuel Vimes. { --- }
Viväcka Vitlöök. { Margrat Gaarlick }
Ysabell. { --- }
Ödet. { Fate }

Locations:
SWEDISH NAME. { ENGLISH NAME, if applicable }

Agateanska Imperiet. { The Agatean Empire }
Bruan Öarna. { The Brown Islands }
Cirkelhavet. { The Circle Sea }
Koomdalen. { Koom Valley }
Källardimensionerna. { The Dungeon Dimensions }
Lanker. { Lancre }
Lankerstad. { Lancretown }
Motviktskontinenten. { The Counter-Weight Continent }
Rammtopparna. { The Ramtops }
Sto-slätten. { The Sto Plains }

That's all I got; feel free to ask 8)
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Sat Jun 11, 2011 9:31 pm

NightWatch, Your nearer than you think with the translation, In Scotland the local dialect or colloquial expression sma & wee = tiny in our region.

<The Wee Free Men - Små blå män - { Tiny Blue Men } >

And Welcome to the forum if I have not done so before. :)
He willnae tak' a drink! I think he's deid! , on the other hand though A Midgie in yir hand is worth twa up yir kilt.
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Postby Tonyblack » Sat Jun 11, 2011 9:53 pm

Welcome to the site, NightWatch! :D And thanks for those. :wink:
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Postby hattie » Wed Aug 10, 2011 8:46 pm

Of course I've seen Bienvenue chez les Cht'is. Hilarious!!!!
They even dubbed it in German...failed miserably because the jokes just don't work out in German.

After beginning to read the french Discworld translations, I have found out how perfect a translation can be!!! This guy is a GENIUS!!!Honestly!! The German translators should die of shame!!!
But apart from the German ones just not being very good translations, I also have a problem with them being..well...German, not Austrian. No Austrian in their right mind would use the word Grütze :-)

That's why I feel more at home reading the English translations than reading the German ones.
(No offence meant to all the Piefkes :twisted:)

Sorry...pity your smaller neighbours :-)
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Postby michelanCello » Wed Aug 10, 2011 8:56 pm

hattie wrote:Of course I've seen Bienvenue chez les Cht'is. Hilarious!!!!

Totally agree :lol:
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Postby ChristianBecker » Thu Aug 11, 2011 7:04 am

hattie wrote:That's why I feel more at home reading the English translations than reading the German ones.
(No offence meant to all the Piefkes :twisted:)

Totally understnadable.
The same is true for Austrian books (or English books translated by an Austrian). There are some unusual (for me) phrases and words in there.
On with their heads! I'm the clown prince of fools
if you don't get the joke it's your loss
Love and laughter you see are the new currency
'cause greed's coinage is not worth a toss

Exile yourself to the unforgiving continent of Wraeclast!
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Postby meerkat » Thu Aug 11, 2011 9:06 am

What is a Piefkas, Chris? I've read that in a Philip Kerr 'Bernie gunther' thriller. Still don;t understand it.
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Postby hattie » Fri Aug 12, 2011 10:09 am

Piefke is a word Austrians use for describing Germans (doesn't mean anything, but isn't meant to be nice, which is why I sort of apologised).
Just as if English people would call them "krauts".
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