Pratchett-like works...

Moderators: Jason, Toothy, Tonyblack

Pratchett-like works...

Postby Quatermass » Fri May 27, 2011 12:23 am

Okay, so you like Terry Pratchett, but you want to branch out. Is there anything worth your time that has a little of his flavour?

I say yes. A few spring to mind.

In no particular order...

Mogworld by Ben 'Yahtzee' Croshaw: If Terry became a lot more scatologically minded and obsessed with video and computer games, this might result. Croshaw is better known for his Zero Punctuation reviews of video games where he is about as scathing as Vimes is towards...just about everyone he can get away with. And this is his first novel, or at least his first published one. And personally, given the state of Zero Punctuation nowadays, I reckon he should give up ZP and take up writing full time instead. This satire of both fantasy and online role playing game tropes is excellent, and reminiscent of Pratchett, if Rincewind was a zombie seeking death and Discworld suddenly became World of Warcraft.


Girl Genius by Phil and Kaja Foglio: I mentioned this webcomic series, involving the misadventures of a young woman in a world of mad scientists, in another thread on this forum. This series has the scent of Pratchett about it, particularly how it blends humour, fantasy, and serious human drama. One of the main antagonists (whether he is actually a villain is debatable at times), Baron Klaus Wulfenbach, is basically Lord Vetinari if he was less subtle, but substantially more a man of action. You also half-expect an Igor to pop up, sooner or later...


The Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold: While the level of humour is rarely at the level of Pratchett, it is comparable to some of the darker Discworld novels. And the main hero of most of the Vorkosigan saga, Miles Vorkosigan, wouldn't look out of place as a Pratchett protagonist. After all, he's a 4 foot 9 brittle boned guy who has a quick mind and a silver tongue. A Civil Campaign is probably the closest to a Pratchett level of humour, but there are many funny moments in this military science fiction saga.
I've lived for over 2000 years, and not all of them were good ones. I've made many mistakes. And it's about time I did something about that.

-The Twelfth Doctor, Doctor Who: Deep Breath
User avatar
Quatermass
Member
 
Posts: 5616
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:58 am

Postby deldaisy » Fri May 27, 2011 3:18 pm

Hmmmm its a hard one Q... but thanks for the tips... will have to put them on my list.

Terry Pratchett has spoiled me for other authors in so many ways.

I have had "homework" the last week. One was to read a book I love to see if I can still read... hence Lords and Ladies.

And I am on a quest for all things that make me laugh... hence why last week I read Dawn French's first book (supposed to be an autobiography but its more a collection of memories). She is one funny lady with a wonderful take on the sublime.

The saddest part of her book is what is NOT written. IT is a book full of her adoration and love for her then husband Lenny Henry, as a father, a husband, a lover, and as a performer. ANd her unswerving faith that no matter what the world hands to them they will weather it as a team. They have since split up.
The Collective Brain: The synoptic serendipity that comes when interesting thoughts from interesting and interested people get together. And the whole is always more than the sum of its parts.
User avatar
deldaisy
Member
 
Posts: 8032
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2010 4:04 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Postby Quatermass » Fri May 27, 2011 11:52 pm

A pity.

Actually, if you're looking for an autobiography with both comedy and pathos, try and track down Who On Earth is Tom Baker? It's funny and sad off and on, although Baker seems to be preoccupied with his penis. Be warned, though. It's not Pratchettian, and you'll hear your preconceptions of the man breaking one by one. :)
I've lived for over 2000 years, and not all of them were good ones. I've made many mistakes. And it's about time I did something about that.

-The Twelfth Doctor, Doctor Who: Deep Breath
User avatar
Quatermass
Member
 
Posts: 5616
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:58 am

Postby The Mad Collector » Sat May 28, 2011 6:41 am

I agree Q, The Tom Baker book is good but it's not one I would lend to my mother. He's an interesting and somewhat odd character.
One of those? Oh I'm sure I have one somewhere..

http://www.bearsonthesquare.com
User avatar
The Mad Collector
Member
 
Posts: 10036
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2010 6:48 am
Location: Ironbridge UK

Postby meerkat » Sat May 28, 2011 7:44 am

Quatermass wrote:A pity.

Actually, if you're looking for an autobiography with both comedy and pathos, try and track down Who On Earth is Tom Baker? It's funny and sad off and on, although Baker seems to be preoccupied with his penis. Be warned, though. It's not Pratchettian, and you'll hear your preconceptions of the man breaking one by one. :)


Yes, I read it and enjoyed it for more who he was than what he did! Got mine from a charity shop for £1.50 cos it was a hardback. Always worth check all charity shops.
Just a meerkat from The Effing Forest
User avatar
meerkat
Member
 
Posts: 13475
Joined: Sat Jan 16, 2010 6:32 pm
Location: Wilberfoss East Riding Yorkshire

Postby Quatermass » Sat May 28, 2011 12:01 pm

The Mad Collector wrote:I agree Q, The Tom Baker book is good but it's not one I would lend to my mother. He's an interesting and somewhat odd character.


Odd is putting it mildly.


meerkat wrote:
Quatermass wrote:A pity.

Actually, if you're looking for an autobiography with both comedy and pathos, try and track down Who On Earth is Tom Baker? It's funny and sad off and on, although Baker seems to be preoccupied with his penis. Be warned, though. It's not Pratchettian, and you'll hear your preconceptions of the man breaking one by one. :)


Yes, I read it and enjoyed it for more who he was than what he did! Got mine from a charity shop for £1.50 cos it was a hardback. Always worth check all charity shops.


Oh, don't get me wrong, I enjoyed the autobiography immensely, and it remains amongst my favourite biographies, but it was very strange to hear these words from a childhood hero. And then, when the DVD documentaries started coming out, you start hearing about worse things, even from Baker's own mouth. How he was rather...aggressive about certain things, like his opinion of scripts.

Still, it was very interesting to read about his childhood, military career, and theatre roles. :)
I've lived for over 2000 years, and not all of them were good ones. I've made many mistakes. And it's about time I did something about that.

-The Twelfth Doctor, Doctor Who: Deep Breath
User avatar
Quatermass
Member
 
Posts: 5616
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:58 am

Postby deldaisy » Sat May 28, 2011 4:41 pm

Oh Dawn French talks alot about penis...'s (penii?) in her book too....but not her own... other peoples.

I ONLY just found out that its the voice of Tom Baker as the voice over on Little Britian!!!!

I hate it when my heroes get knocked down... even if it IS by themselves.

If I read autobiographies, its usually the ones we don't know about. Not Richard Branson, etc. I much prefer to read about the scientist who invented X, or the engineer who designed the X bridge or something. I like to see what lead them to where they got to to DO that.

The only reason I mentioned Dawn French in this thread was because she saw the absurdity in everyday moments (somewhat like TP).
The Collective Brain: The synoptic serendipity that comes when interesting thoughts from interesting and interested people get together. And the whole is always more than the sum of its parts.
User avatar
deldaisy
Member
 
Posts: 8032
Joined: Fri Oct 01, 2010 4:04 pm
Location: Brisbane, Australia

Postby Raz » Tue May 31, 2011 2:58 pm

Have you read 'The Boy Who Kicked Pigs' by Tom Baker? Very dark indeed!
User avatar
Raz
Member
 
Posts: 213
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2010 12:27 pm
Location: Deganwy, North Wales

Postby chris.ph » Tue May 31, 2011 4:49 pm

i had a signed copy of that book and sold it without reading it for about 3times wot i paid for it after i looked it up on abebooks :D
measuring intelligence by exam results is like measuring digestion by turd length
User avatar
chris.ph
Member
 
Posts: 8621
Joined: Tue Aug 12, 2008 11:52 am
Location: swansea south wales

Postby Quatermass » Tue May 31, 2011 11:31 pm

No, I haven't read The Boy Who Kicked Pigs. Never got around to it.
I've lived for over 2000 years, and not all of them were good ones. I've made many mistakes. And it's about time I did something about that.

-The Twelfth Doctor, Doctor Who: Deep Breath
User avatar
Quatermass
Member
 
Posts: 5616
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:58 am

Postby nykk » Sun Sep 11, 2011 12:50 pm

Hello, I'm author Nicholas Andrews and I've just published my very first novel. The story has drawn comparisons to Mr. Pratchett from those who have read it so far, and I figured it would be perfect to mention in this thread. I've been thinking of ways to get the word out, and a great resource would be to get reviews from people who love an author similar to yourself. If anyone is interested in giving a brand new author a chance, you can purchase the book at the following links. Only $0.99 for the e-book. You can't beat that!

Amazon
Facebook (Signed Copies)

I apologize if this breaks any forum rules. But I truly think fans of comedic fantasy will enjoy my work. Here's a brief synopsis:

With the kingdom of Bolognia under attack by independent forces of random malcontents, it's time to send out the army to deal with these troublemakers, right? No, first there's money to be made! Send out the adventurers, those rogues who wander the countryside in search of fame and treasure, and take up all the good seats at the local pubs. Then, organize brackets, stage it for the public's entertainment, offer a prize and call it The Adventure Tournament.

Remy Fairwyn is a ne'er-do-well academic who really wants to become an adventurer. When he hears of the tournament, he jumps at the opportunity, only to find himself out of the frying pan and in the fire. Add ingredients like corrupt organizations, professional wrestlers, narcoleptic thieves, drama kings and malfunctioning magical minutia, and his venture quickly becomes a recipe for disaster. Nevertheless, he blunders his way into being the captain of his own team. Now he can follow his dream, but still has to contend with obstacles such as tournament organizers whose motives may not be clean, an overbearing father holding him to academic pursuits, and his own nonsensical noggin, which is better suited for a pack mule than a dashing hero. Still, he's determined to become the biggest badass warrior to ever wield a large piece of wood.

As the competition heats up, Remy discovers that the tournament itself could be putting the kingdom in danger, and it's up to him to uncover the truth before destruction consumes all he holds dear.[/url]
nykk
New member
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2011 12:38 pm


Return to Non-Discworld books

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest