Looking for Urban Fantasy books

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Postby Beyond Birthday » Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:38 pm

I have a copy of Good Omens. Like Neverwhere I read about half of it.

Oddly enough I don't like Good Omens much at all (which is hilarious considering it's the first Pratchett book I started reading). I hate the constant perspective shifts to characters I don't care about, I hate the long asides the book makes for gags that don't work for me (okay, the end of the world is funny. MOVE. ON.) and I don't like that one scene with that woman who kills everyone in a bar. That last part sounded like it was written for a non-existant movie adaptation.

I might finish it someday but probably only 'after' I've read every other book by Pratchett.
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Postby BaldFriede » Wed Feb 02, 2011 10:30 pm

Did you read the "Borribles" trilogy by Michael De Larrabeiti? The titles of the books are "The Borribles", "The Borribles Go for Broke" and "Across the Dark Metropolis". The trilogy is slightly different from the usual fantasy though, Actually I find the usual fantasy pretty boring; in the end the prince always saves the country and gets the princess, more or less.
Ursula K. Le Guin's "Left Hand of Darkness" is on the borderline between Fantasy and SF; definitely worth reading. it is VERY different. Only partially urban though because the two main characters have to flee across the country in a large part of the book.
And try the books of Walter Moers; he is even weirder than Pratchett. I am not sure all of them have been translated into English though, but at least "The City of Dreaming Books" has.
Last edited by BaldFriede on Fri Feb 04, 2011 11:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Beyond Birthday » Thu Feb 03, 2011 11:26 pm

Thanks to everyone for all the wonderful suggestions.
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Postby Bouncy Castle » Fri Feb 04, 2011 10:39 am

Tonyblack wrote:I'm not quite sure what you mean by urban fantasy, but if I think it's what I think it is, then how about Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman? :D


Couldn't get on with that at all. Gave up about a quarter of the way through.
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Postby pip » Fri Feb 04, 2011 10:44 am

did you watch the program. enjoyed it more than the book to be honest.
:D
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Postby Bouncy Castle » Fri Feb 04, 2011 10:46 am

No, I didn't.
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Postby pip » Fri Feb 04, 2011 10:50 am

well i have an oul dvd of it if you want a loan. i think i owe you a favour.
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Postby Bouncy Castle » Fri Feb 04, 2011 11:53 am

Thanks Pip, but having just read a review of the show, it still leaves me cold.

Dunno why.

I adore Good Omens. I read it at least once a year. Perhaps it's because Terry's involved? :lol:
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Postby pip » Fri Feb 04, 2011 12:15 pm

fair enough. It is a bit hammy at parts. Try a few of the other Gaiman books though. American Gods is absolutely amazing and the graveyard book was one of my favourite books of the last year.
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Postby nickinwestwales » Sat Feb 05, 2011 1:04 am

Good evening all,Heres some titles I have enjoyed:-Roofworld by Christopher Fowler,Perdido street station by China Mieville(in fact anything by him),all of Gaimans stuff,Ghormenghast(stretching a point-does a huge castle & environs constitute `urban`..? )
Hope these are of interest
ATB
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Postby BaldFriede » Sat Feb 05, 2011 4:01 pm

nickinwestwales wrote:Good evening all,Heres some titles I have enjoyed:-Roofworld by Christopher Fowler,Perdido street station by China Mieville(in fact anything by him),all of Gaimans stuff,Ghormenghast(stretching a point-does a huge castle & environs constitute `urban`..? )
Hope these are of interest
ATB
Nick

Are you by any chance a lover of James Joyce's "Finnegan's Wake"? Or why the "HCE" reference?
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Postby nickinwestwales » Fri Mar 11, 2011 2:13 am

Baldfriede:-First,many apologies for this rudely delayed answer:-little free time lately.....
So,in answer-no,have never attempted Joyce-far too dense for my simple tastes-I spend all day packing & posting books to people so when I pick one up to read I need it to make no demands of me.

The HCE reference comes from the basic structure of the books-all the characters live in close proximity to each other,in an ancient rotting castle set in an empty area of land,It creates an `Urban`atmosphere.they are all forced to interact with each other

ATB

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Postby Quatermass » Fri Mar 11, 2011 8:45 am

American Gods and Neverwhere (especially the former) by Neil Gaiman impressed me as urban fantasy literature. Would the Artemis Fowl books count?
"What have you been doing since you stole that antique TARDIS of yours, since you first landed on Skaro? Shouting 'Look at me!!! I'm not fighting a war!', while you battle the Daleks all the way through space and time."

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Postby Wrecks » Mon Mar 21, 2011 6:15 pm

I would recommend anything by Ray Garton. Particularly his Ravenous novel.
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Fri Mar 25, 2011 8:18 pm

These are all urban novels and anthologies they are all American editions
Borderland - Mark Alan Arnold and Terri Windling
Bordertown- Mark Alan Arnold and Terri Windling
Life on the Border - Terri Windling
Essential Bordertown- Delia Sherman and Terri Windling
Nevernever – Will Shettery
Elsewhere - Will Shettery

Series by Kim Harrison
Rachel Morgan: The Hollows urban fiction in Cincinnati
1. Dead Witch Walking (2004)
2. The Good, the Bad, and the Undead (2005)
3. Every Which Way But Dead (2005)
4. A Fistful of Charms (2006)
5. For a Few Demons More (2007)
6. The Outlaw Demon Wails (2008)
aka Where Demons Dare
7. White Witch, Black Curse (2009)
8. Black Magic Sanction (2010)
9. Pale Demon (2011)
should keep you going for a while. :wink:
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