Alzheimer

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Postby kakaze » Sat Oct 10, 2009 2:19 am

Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit wrote:the woman told me of a man she had to kick out when he asked one of her younger workers to wax his booty. :twisted:


Was it Turtle Wax?
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Postby Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit » Sat Oct 10, 2009 5:27 pm

kakaze wrote:
Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit wrote:the woman told me of a man she had to kick out when he asked one of her younger workers to wax his booty. :twisted:


Was it Turtle Wax?


:twisted: :twisted: Unfortunately not, he just wanted the pain... We are an odd species
Aha! So, Bob's yer uncle... very clever.
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Postby Sarka » Sun Oct 11, 2009 7:44 pm

I'm going to intrude and go back to subject of the opening post briefly.

I cared for people with dementia in many of it's forms, both in acute admissions, and the later stages in private care homes. This illness brings a lot of obvious negatives for any person told they have it.

In my experience, each person has an entirely unique experience and presentation. Some people are really content, others not so. Others, in fact don't seem to mind that much and pretty much ignore it, carrying on as before as much as they can, gently accepting of change.

It's not always bad, all of the time. Whilst I cried when I first heard the news about Terry's illness, his strength, research and humour has made me feel such a big girls blouse for crying in the first place. I remembered a lot of people from the past, who showed the same spirit of revolt in the face of dementia, and who made the best of bloody bad luck.
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Postby Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit » Sun Oct 11, 2009 8:36 pm

Sarka wrote:I'm going to intrude and go back to subject of the opening post briefly.

I cared for people with dementia in many of it's forms, both in acute admissions, and the later stages in private care homes. This illness brings a lot of obvious negatives for any person told they have it.

In my experience, each person has an entirely unique experience and presentation. Some people are really content, others not so. Others, in fact don't seem to mind that much and pretty much ignore it, carrying on as before as much as they can, gently accepting of change.

It's not always bad, all of the time. Whilst I cried when I first heard the news about Terry's illness, his strength, research and humour has made me feel such a big girls blouse for crying in the first place. I remembered a lot of people from the past, who showed the same spirit of revolt in the face of dementia, and who made the best of bloody bad luck.


Thank you Sarka. A professional's viewpoint is greatly appreciated, and I also feel like a Big Girl's Blouse for crying over it when I do, but I have to remember that he is a strong man and is getting the same type of help that Stephen Hawking is and that they both have very unique ways of coping and truly odd senses of humour, both of which I ADORE.

We tend to be a little .... digressive about topics and I think this thread it becomes a brain-pain, eyes hurting from tears, emotional avoidance thingy sort of fing. If you know what I mean. Thank you so much for that input tho. It helps a lot. (((Hugs)))
Aha! So, Bob's yer uncle... very clever.
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Postby Lady Vetinari » Sun Oct 11, 2009 8:47 pm

Sarka

I think that Nurses are the real heroes in the NHS, they work long, hard hours, putting up with tumours, humours, and various other ailments ending in ours. Bed bathing, helping patients to the loo - and all sorts of mucky thankless jobs and get paid PITTANCE :evil: !

Then there are over-paid over-hyped sports and celebs (Jordan, Peter Andre, David Beckham ... that ILK!) THAT get called Heroes and whinge whenever they break a nail!!!!!!!

So, all my admiration and respect goes to your former calling and I am sorry that it has all gone down hill!
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Postby kakaze » Sun Oct 11, 2009 11:40 pm

Sarka wrote:In my experience, each person has an entirely unique experience and presentation. Some people are really content, others not so. Others, in fact don't seem to mind that much and pretty much ignore it, carrying on as before as much as they can, gently accepting of change.


I would agree with that. I've also worked as a caregiver in an assisted living facility for people with dementia. Of course, the term "dementia" covers a very wide range.

I would guess that how people cope with it depends on how much they used their mind before, which part of the mind their disease attacks, and what they've got hidden in their subconcious (and, of course, their personality).
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Postby Sarka » Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:49 am

Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit wrote:Thank you Sarka. A professional's viewpoint is greatly appreciated, and I also feel like a Big Girl's Blouse for crying over it when I do, but I have to remember that he is a strong man and is getting the same type of help that Stephen Hawking is and that they both have very unique ways of coping and truly odd senses of humour, both of which I ADORE.

We tend to be a little .... digressive about topics and I think this thread it becomes a brain-pain, eyes hurting from tears, emotional avoidance thingy sort of fing. If you know what I mean. Thank you so much for that input tho. It helps a lot. (((Hugs)))


Yes Hawkings is a wonderful guy. And I understand about digressions, I love them :). One thing I always disliked about the NIN boards was not allowing you to stray. I did feel as though I was butting in, hence I felt I should say. I haven't really said anything to anyone about it, as no Pratchett fans near by, so it was good to read the thread and see everyone else as daft as me. :)

Lady Vetinari wrote:Sarka

I think that Nurses are the real heroes in the NHS, they work long, hard hours, putting up with tumours, humours, and various other ailments ending in ours. Bed bathing, helping patients to the loo - and all sorts of mucky thankless jobs and get paid PITTANCE :evil: !

Then there are over-paid over-hyped sports and celebs (Jordan, Peter Andre, David Beckham ... that ILK!) THAT get called Heroes and whinge whenever they break a nail!!!!!!!

So, all my admiration and respect goes to your former calling and I am sorry that it has all gone down hill!


It's so lovely that you feel like that. .
You nurse because you can, because you want to. The minute you don't feel like that, it's time to get out. I like older people whilst they are a tough crowd I seldom went through a day without laughing. I could not stand to see them mistreated, their care mismanaged and lives devalued as I started to in NHS and private care.

kakaze wrote:I would agree with that. I've also worked as a caregiver in an assisted living facility for people with dementia. Of course, the term "dementia" covers a very wide range.


Indeed, when it comes to viewing any person with a disease holistically the quality of the journey is valuable, that is what I was trying to describe.

kakaze wrote:I would guess that how people cope with it depends on how much they used their mind before, which part of the mind their disease attacks, and what they've got hidden in their subconcious (and, of course, their personality).


I agree good mental health and for want of a better words, 'inner peace' prior to to visible symptoms, appear to make a difference.
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Postby chris.ph » Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:09 pm

Lady Vetinari wrote:Sarka

I think that Nurses are the real heroes in the NHS, they work long, hard hours, putting up with tumours, humours, and various other ailments ending in ours. Bed bathing, helping patients to the loo - and all sorts of mucky thankless jobs and get paid PITTANCE :evil: !

Then there are over-paid over-hyped sports and celebs (Jordan, Peter Andre, David Beckham ... that ILK!) THAT get called Heroes and whinge whenever they break a nail!!!!!!!

So, all my admiration and respect goes to your former calling and I am sorry that it has all gone down hill!




i think nurses are a pain in my arse :lol: :lol: and if i find out who shaved my arse off im going to wax their head :twisted: :lol:
measuring intelligence by exam results is like measuring digestion by turd length
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Postby Sarka » Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:24 pm

Blimey! What happened to you?
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Postby Batty » Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:37 pm

chris.ph wrote:i think nurses are a pain in my arse :lol: :lol: and if i find out who shaved my arse off im going to wax their head :twisted: :lol:

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Postby Batty » Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:41 pm

Sarka wrote:Blimey! What happened to you?

Here's a reminder. It is well worth reading again! :lol:
chris.ph wrote:the first time i had a colonoscopy they gave me an alcohol based sedative it was supposed to knock me out , it didnt even touch me the doctor asked me how much i could drink so i told him about 16pints , he just shook his head and laughed id just absorbed the equivelant of about 12 pints and was still talking normally. i asked for my specs back and they moved the telly so i could watch, the procedure was progressing , taking biopsys and such when i spotted a black mark in my colon and asked the doctor what it was, he said it was my appendix, i then asked him "how bloody far are you up there" :wink:
the one they knocked me out for the week b4 last was funnier. i got home and had a bath as i was drying my arse i yelled out "f@@@@@@ h@@@" my misses thought there was something wrong and asked if i was ok and i yelled back that the b@@@@@@s had shaved my arse when i was out cold. she nearly wet herself laughing :lol: :lol:
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Postby Sarka » Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:37 am

:lol: excellent. i bet they did it with an NHS industrial razor too.
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Postby chris.ph » Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:02 pm

i will get REVENGE :twisted: :twisted:
measuring intelligence by exam results is like measuring digestion by turd length
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Postby kakaze » Sat Oct 17, 2009 1:28 am

Very interesting photo (and idea):

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A translucent zebrafish larva showing the nervous system of the fish (green), the expression of the protein Tau (in red), and Alzheimer-like alterations of Tau (in blue). In humans Tau protein aggregates in the brains of Alzheimer patients and plays a major role in the degeneration of brain cells. By bringing Tau into translucent zebrafish larvae, the disease-causing effects of the protein can be studied directly under the microscope.
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Postby Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit » Sat Oct 17, 2009 5:19 pm

Those poor fishies, they are always filling 'em with fluorescent dye so kiddies will want them. At least there is SOME good coming from it :D
Aha! So, Bob's yer uncle... very clever.
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