for terry

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for terry

Postby meerkat » Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:50 pm

Hi, can you pass on a message to Terry?
Through reading his books I was really helped through two bouts of depression. I suddenly realised I could laugh. It was comforting to know there was a soul out there with a sense of humour like mine!

My cousin, now retired from the Royal Opera House Covent Garden where she worked for Dame Monica Mason (name dropping finished), said Masquerade was so spot on she couldn't put the book down!

Boundary Players, Aldermaston, recently portrayed Going Postal raising money for Alztheimers. I played Reacher Gilt and thoroughly enjoyed it.

p.s. I thuink I saw Granny Weatherwax on paltform 10 at Waterloo! :shock: [/i]
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Postby theoldlibrarian » Mon Jan 18, 2010 7:59 pm

If I ever have the good fortune of Meeting Terry Pratchett, I promise I will pass on your message.
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Postby Bouncy Castle » Tue Jan 19, 2010 6:44 pm

Meerkat.

You are not the first person I've met/spoken on the Net (ooh, I'm a poet!!) that has said that about Terry's books.
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The rest of us are a bit crap.
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Postby Tonyblack » Tue Jan 19, 2010 7:33 pm

Terry's books have certainly helped me with my depression, and they continue to do so. And not just his books. All the friends I've made online or at events due to his writing.

I even met my wife, Sharlene because of Terry's books. A Hat Full of Sky will always be a very special book to us. :D
"Goodness is about what you do. Not what you pray to."
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Postby Moist von Lipwig » Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:58 am

Tonyblack, the same with me. I had quite huge depression but it ended month ago, when I started reading Terry. It was a shock, the world wasn't the same as previous. I started looking at it with different eye (Teatime's glass eye, I think).
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Postby theoldlibrarian » Mon Jan 25, 2010 4:58 pm

Also great if you have insomnia, because it entertains you when awake. But awful if you dont because it will give you insomnia.
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Mon Jan 25, 2010 5:11 pm

theoldlibrarian could you repeat that once more Image don't worry I have double posted myself :wink: :lol:
He willnae tak' a drink! I think he's deid! , on the other hand though A Midgie in yir hand is worth twa up yir kilt.
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Postby theoldlibrarian » Tue Jan 26, 2010 6:13 pm

sorry about that :roll:
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Postby Tonyblack » Tue Jan 26, 2010 6:53 pm

Sorry about what? :wink:
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Tue Jan 26, 2010 7:04 pm

Tony your a wind up merchant. now you did see it now you dont who did it.Image search for the missing post. :wink: :lol:
He willnae tak' a drink! I think he's deid! , on the other hand though A Midgie in yir hand is worth twa up yir kilt.
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Postby theoldlibrarian » Wed Jan 27, 2010 2:45 pm

Tony you clever man :shock:
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terry pratchcett

Postby meerkat » Wed Jan 27, 2010 6:32 pm

And there was me thing I was mad. I like this web site. I feel at home!

Don't worry old librarian, it comes to us all :wink: [/i]
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Postby BeadyDragon » Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:49 pm

I hope you don't mind me sharing my 'How the Discworld books changed my life' as well, but this seemed to be the best thread for it and now, when it feels like the beginning of the end, I really want to share it.

When I was seven years old, I had completed all the levels of reading material my primary school had to offer me. In order to challenge me with something harder (i.e. without pictures in it), they gave me Children of the New Forest. Now, I'm sure many people find that a very fine book to read, but I just couldn't finish it - it was too boring! I came to the conclusion that once books didn't have pictures in, maybe grown-ups only read because it was one of those things grown-ups are supposed to do, like pay the bills or go to the gym.

But my older brother, who epitomised cool for me when I was little (and probably still does a bit), seemed to actively enjoy reading. He never went anywhere without a book carefully wrapped up in bubble wrap. Being his adorable little sister, I grabbed it to try and figure out what was so great about this book that he was reading that made it better than Children of the New Forest. The book was Pyramids.

My older brother insisted that I read the books in order, starting with Truckers, Diggers, and Wings before I could even contemplate The Colour of Magic. And once I started reading, well, I'm you can all imagine what happened - the addiction, the fights over who got to read the latest Pratchett next, sleepless nights of just one more page...

The Discworld books got me back into reading in a big way, and also got me into writing for fun as well, thus improving my written English skills quite considerably. By the time I reached secondary school, I was surrounding myself with books, dividing my spare time between volunteering as librarian in the school's library, and writing my own stories. Enjoying the library work so much, I first did a work-experience placement, and then a part-time job with the local library. Enjoying that so much, I chose to study Information and Library Studies at university.

That decision led to me getting a degree in Library Studies, and also meeting the man who was to become my husband. He introduced me to a line of work I really hadn't considered as a librarian before, but is challenging and very, very rewarding, plus is a stable enough job that we were able to get a mortgage and our first house together.

So, really, I have Terry Pratchett to thank for my job, my degree, my house, and my husband.

Sorry for the long post.
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Postby Tonyblack » Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:57 pm

Hi BeadyDragon and welcome to the site. :D

Thanks for sharing your story - I think a lot of us here have got a lot to thank Terry for - I know I have.
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Postby Sjoerd3000 » Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:02 pm

Welcome to the forum BeadyDragon :D
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