next great writer?

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next great writer?

Postby theoldlibrarian » Sun Jan 10, 2010 2:40 am

Terry Pratchett will surely go down as one of the gretaest writers of the 20th and 21st centuries. In history he will go alongside Tolkien, Steinbeck and Blyton.
But does anyone know of any great immerging writers. What Im looking for is preferably fantasy, definately a series to keep us busy and something original, witty and exciting?
(kids series are fine but not preferable)
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Postby Tonyblack » Sun Jan 10, 2010 7:31 am

Have you read any Jasper Fforde librarian? His books are well worth checking out. :)
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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Mon Jan 11, 2010 12:38 am

I'd vote for Julian May and her Saga of the Exiles (4 books); Intervention and Galactic Milieu (also 4 in all although the Milieu's a distinct series) - it's total SFF but the whole concept is so neat and intelligent and it has time travel and mind powers too! :lol:

I'm also liking rereading Stephen Lawhead's Pendragon Cycle as well, especially as I've found there's 2 I haven't read - that's pure fantasy but it sits well in historical themes too. 5 books about King Arthur, Merlin and his da Taliesin :D
Last edited by Jan Van Quirm on Tue Jan 12, 2010 5:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Dotsie » Mon Jan 11, 2010 5:39 am

Someone on here put me onto Christopher Moore, he's very good & funny. A. Lee Martinez is also good (they're both sort of monsters & demons).

Not fantasy, but a very good example of SciFi, is Ian M. Banks. Don't knock it til you've tried it!
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Postby theoldlibrarian » Mon Jan 11, 2010 11:48 am

Iain M Banks and the pendragon series are both great. I hear that Christopher Moore is good aswell but I have not read him yet. Certainly will check out the other suggestions.
Personally I recomend the Dune books which are ancient but I only started recently.
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Mon Jan 11, 2010 1:21 pm

I been a long time fan of Michael Moorcock and Tad Williams is good too.
He willnae tak' a drink! I think he's deid! , on the other hand though A Midgie in yir hand is worth twa up yir kilt.
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Postby Grymm » Mon Jan 11, 2010 3:12 pm

Have you tried Robert Rankins Brentford Trilogy, I know he's hardly new but if you like your stuff on the odd side of Fortean.........
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Postby chris.ph » Mon Jan 11, 2010 6:00 pm

peter f hamilton,is a brilliant writer from the greg mandel novels upto the nuetronium alchemist saga :)
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Postby Danny B » Tue Jan 12, 2010 2:01 am

Originality is a precious commodity, but if you don't mind your old fashioned fantasy tropes with new life breathed into them, then there are three British writers I'd recommend - two are just emerging, one has been around a while but is only now finding his voice. Joe Abercrombie and his First Law series, James Barclay and his Raven cycle and Stan Nicholls and his Orcs series. All of them write traditional action based fantasy novels, but add an earthiness and snappy dialogue that's so often missing in other High fantasy. Jane Lindskold is a touch more traditional than the three British writers I've mentioned, but her characters are engaging, her novels are tightly plotted and well paced and she has good ear for entertaining sarcasm, particularly in the Firekeeper series.

If you want something in a vaguely similar vein to the great Mr P., then there's not a great deal out there beyond the already mentioned Jasper Fforde and Robert Rankin, as well as Tom Holt and Robert Aspirin. Maybe try The Fallible Fiend by L. Sprague de Camp? that's really good fun.:) I also hear good things about Kim Newman, but I haven't had a chance to read his work yet.

If you don't mind a darker and more horror tinged edge to go along with some witty dialogue and fast paced action in a real world setting, then maybe give Mark Chadbourn or Christopher Fowler a try. Both of them are very good indeed, but don't rely on either of them for a happy ending.
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Postby Penfold » Tue Jan 12, 2010 2:28 am

Danny B wrote:Originality is a precious commodity, but if you don't mind your old fashioned fantasy tropes with new life breathed into them, then there are three British writers I'd recommend - two are just emerging, one has been around a while but is only now finding his voice. Joe Abercrombie and his First Law series, James Barclay and his Raven cycle and Stan Nicholls and his Orcs series.

I only know about Dan Nicholls and his Orc series and have to agree with Danny. They are a good read and it is refreshing to get a topic based upon 'the other sides' perspective.

I'll keep an eye out for the other two authors when I next raid my local bookshop!
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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Tue Jan 12, 2010 2:32 am

Stan's the man!! Dan may be his brother. Image :lol:
He willnae tak' a drink! I think he's deid! , on the other hand though A Midgie in yir hand is worth twa up yir kilt.
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Postby Willem » Tue Jan 12, 2010 10:27 am

I recommend George R.R. Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series to everyone that likes to read. It's a great story, full of surprises.
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Postby CrysaniaMajere » Tue Jan 12, 2010 10:34 am

Willem wrote:I recommend George R.R. Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' series to everyone that likes to read. It's a great story, full of surprises.

What's the first one of the series?
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Postby Penfold » Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:04 am

Who's Wee Dug wrote:Stan's the man!! Dan may be his brother. Image :lol:

Image Sorry, I meant Stan. I typed that after a long, hard shift. :oops: :oops: :oops:
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Postby Willem » Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:10 am

CrysaniaMajere wrote:What's the first one of the series?


First one's 'A Game of Thrones'

Be warned, this is going to be a series of 7 books. Book 4 was published October 2005 and we've been waiting for the next one ever since. Eagerly.
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