Apart for Terry who do you consider the best writers?

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Postby deldaisy » Wed Jan 19, 2011 5:33 pm

The wisdom of Winnie The Pooh....
http://thinkexist.com/quotes/winnie_the_pooh/

http://www.just-pooh.com/pooh.html

Actually I love the very first line of the book Winnie the Pooh....

Winnie the Pooh lives by himself in a tree in Hundred Acre Wood under the name of Sanders. "It means he had the name over the door in gold letters, and lived under it


... thats the promise of the book.... and what is to come.... stuff and nonsense.
The Collective Brain: The synoptic serendipity that comes when interesting thoughts from interesting and interested people get together. And the whole is always more than the sum of its parts.
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Postby Portia » Fri Jan 21, 2011 9:41 am

I'm throwing Evelyn Waugh, F. Scott Fizgerald, Nabokov, Ian McEwan, Zadie Smith and Donna Tartt out there too!

I was first introduced to Waugh when I was 15 years old, via Stephen Fry's adaptation of Vile Bodies. When I read the book I was struck by how amazingly funny the dialogue was. I loved his sparse, modernist writing style and silly characters like Miles Malpractice. Later at university I took a brilliant course on imperial fiction and discovered Decline and Fall and Black Mischief - which are both deeply Conservative in nature yet hilarious commentary on education, class and Empire.

Like Waugh, Ian McEwan and Nabokov chronicle 'doomed romances' incredibly well. In the popular imagination, I think 'sleazy' is often used to describe Humbert's confessions in Lolita but actually he is very funny and touching. Meanwhile Ian McEwan's novella On Chesil Beach is a very poignant tale of a wedding night that goes horribly wrong.

I read Donna Tartt's The Secret History in my first year of university and could relate to her eager-to-please West Coast protagonist who has just started reading Classics at an East Coast liberal arts college. Her observations on the East Coast/West Coast divide and 'professor worship' are very good indeed.
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Postby BaldFriede » Sat Jan 29, 2011 12:05 am

"The Secret History" was a very enjoyable read indeed. Unusual construction of the book too. It starts with the murder, then recalls the events that led to it, then in the middle of the book the murder happens "again", only this time we know why it happens, and what follows is the aftermath of the murder. And while everything before the murder is a build-up, everything afterwards is a sort of decay.
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Postby nickinwestwales » Tue Feb 08, 2011 2:56 am

Delighted to have a pocket summary of `Secret History`-been packing and posting copies for years without ever having time to even look at the cover and read the synopsis-such is life-one day.............
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Ghormenghast

Postby nickinwestwales » Tue Feb 08, 2011 3:39 am

Now then,since we are all assembled :- Would be interested to take your views on the Ghormenghast Trilogy -much as I love the works of Yer Man Pratchett,The imagined world of Titus Groan and his singular environment captured my imagination like no other-I will concede that the third volume broke the spell (the characters were as well drawn ,but somehow never drew me in in the same way )-but the first two :- from first word until last, I was a slave to Swelter ,the appalling chef,Flay-`Masters chief servant`-the keeper of the bright carvings,locked in his gallery and the twins-desperate in their lust for power-the doctor and his awful sister,The masters of the college,The Earl,maddened by Owls-the Countess ,with her train of white cats ,the almost beautiful Fuschia,Nanny Slagg-nursemaid to generations of Groans,and at the heart Titus & Steerpike-The chosen one and the kitchen boy who will climb across the heron haunted flagstones of the castle roof to fight a duel to the death in the Ivy choked facade of the great castle

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Postby chris.ph » Tue Feb 08, 2011 7:29 pm

nickinwestwales wrote:Delighted to have a pocket summary of `Secret History`-been packing and posting copies for years without ever having time to even look at the cover and read the synopsis-such is life-one day.............
ATB
Nick


dont tell me you work in macmillans in pontarddulais :lol:
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Postby rockershovel » Tue Feb 08, 2011 8:06 pm

another vote for Evelyn Waugh

Lewis Carroll

Herman Melville

Nicholas Monsarratt
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Postby BaldFriede » Tue Feb 08, 2011 9:00 pm

Robert Anton Wilson is an excellent author too. I especially loved "Masks of the Illuminati", a book in which Albert Einstein and James Joyce meet in Zürich at the beginning of the 20th century and together solve a series of mysterious suicides.
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Postby captainmeme » Wed Feb 16, 2011 4:55 pm

I've got to say either John Bunyan or H.G. Wells (A bit old-fashoined, but they're brilliant).
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Postby TheTurtleMoves » Wed Feb 23, 2011 4:07 am

Neal Stephenson
Stephen Fry
Bo Fowler
Peter F. Hamilton
Jaqueline Wilson (I don't care that she's a kids author, I think a lot of the things she has written are awesome)
Beatrix Potter
"We're on a mission from Glod"
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Postby Pearwood » Wed Feb 23, 2011 11:26 am

Philip K. Dick
Robert E. Howard
Alex Garland
Anthony Burgess (although I find he can be too self-indulgent at times)
Alexandre Dumas
Lewis Carrol
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Postby pip » Wed Feb 23, 2011 11:31 am

Currently on a bit of a Philip K Dick buzz and have been gradually working my way through his books. Next on the list is counter clock world.
Big fan of Lewis Carroll as well.
They have a great Alice shop across from Christchurch Uni in Oxford which was bloody brilliant. :D
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Postby Pearwood » Wed Feb 23, 2011 11:52 am

pip wrote:Currently on a bit of a Philip K Dick buzz and have been gradually working my way through his books. Next on the list is counter clock world.

Haven't read that one yet. Let me know how it is! :D
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Postby pip » Wed Feb 23, 2011 12:03 pm

I will. Probably be a few weeks til i get to it though.
Starting the last part of the Gormenghast books today .
:D
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Postby Tonyblack » Wed Feb 23, 2011 12:12 pm

I preferred Dick's version of Blade Runner (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep) to the movie version. The protagonist was a much more complex man. :D
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