Equal Rites Discussion *Spoilers*

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Postby CrysaniaMajere » Thu Nov 05, 2009 4:42 pm

kakaze wrote:As someone who'd done translation work, I think that translating a book with as many puns as the average Discworld book has, would be very difficult.


I know, and they often do a good work, they found a good translation for CMOT Dibbler that was really something, but sometimes they make some mistakes that leave you... once, on a serious book, I read that the soldiers were dying because they were ugly... There's definitely something wrong there! :?

What made me angry :evil: is when they choose to change something. If you're a translator I hope you don't do it. Like, in one of Terry Brooks' books, an elf girl calls his partner of adventure "Valeman" because of where he comes from, and the translator decided it wasn't nice and changed it with "wil", his name, causing a change in their relationship and a consistent error on in the story. I was a little girl then and I thought the writer was dumb.. well, I was little..
years after I bought the book in english and found out ALL the things she had changed. :evil:
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Postby Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit » Thu Nov 05, 2009 4:45 pm

Phoenix wrote:
poohcarrot wrote:
poohcarrot wrote:I can't think of much to say about this book, so I'll wait for someone to say something stupid and then argue with them. :twisted:

(Jan's usually good for a stupid comment or two. So is SWReader, but she's incapacitated at the moment.)


Phoenix wrote:
Eh, I've quite probably said something silly in the above, so please be gentle with me and leave some limbs attached ;)


Um... I was only joking! Only trying to wind up Jan and hopefully bring a smile to the face of SWReader. :oops:


Hehe, I was taking it as a joke and I was joking too... hence the wink :)


Pooh's bark is worse than his bite. Consider him as ... oh, our version of Loki the Norse god of chaos and jokes. We lub him and alternately desire to spank hiim, in a mettyforical sense. :lol:
Aha! So, Bob's yer uncle... very clever.
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Postby Trish » Fri Nov 06, 2009 12:24 am

kakaze wrote:
Trish wrote:No, this is Granny, who'd say something to the tune of: If a thing is worth doing, do it as hard as you can.
It's the obverse of "in for a penny, in for a pound."


When I was a kid I could never figure out what a penny and a pound had in common. I mean, one is a coin and the other is a measure of weight.


Not really. A penny, or a pence or 1P, is the smallest unit of measurement for the pound Sterling.
So, if you'll up for a penny, you might as well spend a pound.
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Postby kakaze » Fri Nov 06, 2009 6:57 am

Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit wrote:
kakaze wrote:
Trish wrote:No, this is Granny, who'd say something to the tune of: If a thing is worth doing, do it as hard as you can.
It's the obverse of "in for a penny, in for a pound."


When I was a kid I could never figure out what a penny and a pound had in common. I mean, one is a coin and the other is a measure of weight.


until you realized that penny and pound were actually both monetary thingies? or I, being a bluidy minded american assumed it was in for a penny's weight, in for a pound worth...? :lol:


No, you're right; it was when I found out that the Brits called their money "Pounds".

But by then I was more confused about how a society could go around paying for things with peas. Wouldn't they get all mushy?
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Postby poohcarrot » Fri Nov 06, 2009 7:45 am

Too right they get mushy! Then we eat them. Fish, chips and mushy peas - a typical English breakfast that 90% of Brits eat at least 5 times a week, but not on Fridays.

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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:21 pm

PMSL :lol:

Gods you're a sod smartypants! - perpetrating mythic stereotypes on these innocent colonials!! :roll: That's fish and chips which is not breakfast and in a lot of quarters is most eaten of a Friday night (old christian trad of no meat on Fridays). :wink:

Fish for breakfast is generally - kippers (herrings - salted/pickled and then smoked) or kedgeree (smoked haddock with cooked rice and eggs, sometimes with a bit of curry powder/sauce and peas as well) - no chips see? :lol:

Fish, chips and mushy peas with lots of salt and malt vinegar (has to be malt!) are a tea or dinner-time meal and again curry sauce is quite popular too these days.

With the pound money - this was possibly linked to a pound in weight at one time as 20 shillings (now 100 pence) buying a pounds worth of something or other - maybe pooh can enlighten us on that score :lol:
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Postby Lady Vetinari » Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:24 pm

Is that why it's called Friday ... because of all the fried food we eat?
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Postby poohcarrot » Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:33 pm

Jan Van Quirm wrote:With the pound money - this was possibly linked to a pound in weight at one time as 20 shillings (now 100 pence) buying a pounds worth of something or other - maybe pooh can enlighten us on that score :lol:


In days of yore, 20 shillings (one pound) used to be able to buy a a pound of Afghan Double Zero (hashish). This was when the Brits tried to rule the Afghans but failed, and before the Russians tried to rule the Afghans but failed, and way, way before the Brits (again) and the US tried to rule the Afghans (but I'm sure they'll succeed this time).
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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:33 pm

Nope - is to do with Old English/Saxon/Norse myth like some of the other days

Fri = Freya's (or maybe Frig, fertility/agricultural gods anyway)
Thurs = Thor
Wednes = Woden/Odin
Tues = Tyr or Tīw war god

rest of 'em are astronomical - Moon, Sun and Saturn :wink:

Friday in early christian times was a traditional fasting day from meat to show respect for the Crucifixion and the death of Jesus so linked to the communion, but really it was likely already in the culture from before Roman times, because of meat being an expensive commodity (much like it is in some 3rd World places today) and fish were more readily available to most people whether or not they lived near the sea. All the red meat animals back then were also not for regular consumption as they were needed for milk, wool etc so fish was more available and easier to keep than pork for instance. :wink:
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Postby poohcarrot » Fri Nov 06, 2009 1:45 pm

Jan Van Quirm wrote:Friday in early christian times was a traditional fasting day from meat to show respect for the Crucifixion and the death of Jesus...


How bizarre! :?

Was Jesus trampled to death by a herd of cows? Or pecked to death by a rabid chicken?
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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Fri Nov 06, 2009 2:54 pm

Nope Friday was just the day he's supposed to have died allegedly (the day - not that he died 'cos he did). :wink:

And the economics and dietary reasons stand for Judea at that time as well as colder climates. Also most religions tend to like their adherents hungry but alive for the most part - makes 'em much more tractable 8)

Did I mention chickens? Not sure if they have chickens outside of Far Eastern and Oriental parts in those times? Think it was mostly ducks and geese that were the poultry options in Europe and Asia Minor in those days? :roll:
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Postby Sjoerd3000 » Fri Nov 06, 2009 3:48 pm

Jan Van Quirm wrote:Nope Friday was just the day he's supposed to have died allegedly (the day - not that he died 'cos he did). :wink:

And the economics and dietary reasons stand for Judea at that time as well as colder climates. Also most religions tend to like their adherents hungry but alive for the most part - makes 'em much more tractable 8)

Did I mention chickens? Not sure if they have chickens outside of Far Eastern and Oriental parts in those times? Think it was mostly ducks and geese that were the poultry options in Europe and Asia Minor in those days? :roll:


According to wikipedia they had chickens back then. The Phoenicians spread chickens along the Mediterranean coasts, to Iberia in the 1st millennium BC :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken#Origins
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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Fri Nov 06, 2009 4:08 pm

Thanks Sjoerd - wasn't sure if they had them back then. Phoenicians were visiting Cornwall if nowhere else in the UK (lots of tin and copper which was also traded with the Bretons and Basques) so we might have had them as well. Anyway back then I think birds and fish weren't seen as 'proper' meat in that they didn't need hunting or herding as such. :P
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Postby Tonyblack » Fri Nov 06, 2009 4:26 pm

Dragging this topic kicking and screaming back to ER... :wink:

Does anyone think it a bit hypocritical of Granny one minute looking down her nose at what Hilta was doing and the next minute doing the same thing - selling preparations in A-M?

By the way - pennyroyal, which is mentioned a few times was used to abort pregnancies.
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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Fri Nov 06, 2009 5:29 pm

:oops:

She's definitely being a hypocrite - the fortune-telling thing's just another stock-in-trade for witches - but it is more an urban thing. People in rural or remote regions haven't generally got so much time for frivolities... :P

Methods of contraception (of which abortion was really the only option in most of those type of rural communities) and female affinity and tolerance of witches go hand in hand. The palm reading/gypsy aspect is as good a way as any to cloud other more practical consultations. Pennyroyal's just one of several herbal methods of causing miscarriage or with contraceptive properties that go as far back as late neolithic times (in Ancient Egypt in particular) although they weren't too reliable especially if taken over long periods.

We've had discussions about witches v wizards, difference thereof before and what it comes down is basic biology and mostly sex (having it, making and preventing babies and feeding them once born). Though males can participate of course, some of those aspects are physically impossible for them and so this means that women's concerns and skills require 'magic' - knowledge, empathy and hands on and off support which is best provided by their own gender.

All the women of the Ramtops value their witches as Terry constantly underlines with the Lancre witches and with Tiffany and indeed Mrs Googol in Genua who's an exotic cultural witch of course and moreover an urban one so Hilta has more common ground with voodoo magic to some extent, what with living in a larger community than Granny. Love potions are also a nice little earner for witches and a more even-handed sexual service for both genders of course - what man would go to a Wizard for that I ask you! Much better to go to Granny or even better Nanny as they understand these things so much better! :twisted:

Actually that's another big, big difference isn't it? Discword Wizards are nearly always celibate and happy to be so it appears. Sex (and it's repercussions) and Wizards aren't a good fit. There are exceptions of course, that almost always end in catastrophe (like Coin's horrible father in Sourcery). Whereas with witches there's matrilinear proof with Granny and with Tiffany who had other witches in the family and then there's Nanny as living proof that abundant sex and witchcraft are totally compatible... :lol:
Last edited by Jan Van Quirm on Fri Nov 06, 2009 8:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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