Names of Characters in Foreign Editions.

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For a man with a Welsh name, there's not much in Welsh...

Postby AgProv » Fri Aug 19, 2011 8:54 pm

Boringly, there aren't many Terry Pratchett books available in Welsh and only one Discworld, as yet. Leaving aside the issue that for many Welsh people, English is the foreign language, we have...

Llyfrau sydd wedi eu cyfieithu i'r Gymraeg:-

Joni a'r Meirwon (ISBN 086074132X)-- Cyfieithiad Aled P. Jones o Johnny and the Dead
Dim Ond Ti All Achub y Ddynoliaeth (ISBN 0860741443)-- Cyfieithiad Aled P. Jones o Only You Can Save Mankind
Lleidr Amser (ISBN 1904357008)-- Cyfieithiad Dyfrig Parri o Thief of Time

It looks as if the Johnny Maxwell books have made it, but Discworld is yet to make a cultural impression.


http://cy.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_Pratchett

http://cy.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lleidr_Amser

(Dyfrig Parri is named as Pratchett's Welsh translator, at least of Thief of Time).
Last edited by AgProv on Fri Aug 19, 2011 9:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby AgProv » Fri Aug 19, 2011 9:04 pm

I did a comprehensive list of all main characters and book titles once, for another forum - unfortunately I can't find it...


I remember, I was in the same forum... Lady Adara's, as I recall. I shall see if i can locate it...
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Postby Anilori » Fri Aug 19, 2011 9:28 pm

Don't worry, I found it and pasted it in a few pages back!
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Postby Poppy » Sun Sep 11, 2011 3:45 pm

I'm a native English speaker but I've been reading some Discworld books in French partly to brush up on my rusty A-level knowledge of the language.

I'm currently reading Men at Arms / Le Guet des Orfèvres and it's interesting to see how some of the less correct English used by eg Gaspode is translated. For instance, 'dunno' is 'chaispas' (a contraction of 'je ne sais pas'/'I don't know') 'wossname' becomes 'chaispasquoi' ('I don't know what').

Various contractions are used to give Gaspode what I'm guessing is the French equivalent of a sort of rough East End of London way of speaking: 'T'as d'la veine que j'sois là' for instance, instead of 'Tu as de la veine que je sois là' ('you're lucky I'm here'), and the 'ne' is missed out of negative phrases: 'j'suis pas membre' instead of 'je ne suis pas membre' ('I'm not a member').

Also it's interesting to see who uses 'tu' (the informal 'you') and who uses 'vous' (the formal 'you'). Carrot and Angua, for instance, use 'vous' to each other throughout, even though I'd have thought Carrot would say 'tu' to Angua as he outranks her. Angua and Gaspode use the informal 'tu' to each other straight away, and Nobby and Colon are also on informal terms. Death, as a consummate professional, uses 'vous' to all his clients! Does this stay the same in other languages where there's a similar distinction?

(PS - Apologies for any incorrect French)
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Postby Tonyblack » Sun Sep 11, 2011 3:50 pm

Welcome to the site Poppy! :D Some interesting observations there.
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Postby Macarona » Sun Sep 11, 2011 5:08 pm

Poppy wrote: the 'ne' is missed out of negative phrases

Having lived in france it is interesting to see the extremely formal version of french taught at A-level, chaispas and removal of ne is often used in regular speech and especially with children having a chat. I just find it interesting that such things are considered irregular by an A-level student.
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Postby michelanCello » Sun Sep 11, 2011 7:02 pm

Welcome, Poppy! :D

Ow, and about the formal/informal "you" - that's what I always liked in english language... I mean, there's the I don't know how many past tenses and other l"ovely" grammar forms english learners have to deal with, but at least I don't have to think about the fact whether I should address someone informally or formally (which is the case in any other language I know :P )
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