Unseen Academicals **Spoilers**

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Postby Dotsie » Fri Oct 16, 2009 3:44 pm

Do you know, I had forgotten that other's wouldn't spot that either :oops:
What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!
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Postby Batty » Fri Oct 16, 2009 5:49 pm

I did mention yonks ago, that I wondered if Juliet was named after Jules Rimet? Image
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Postby poohcarrot » Fri Oct 16, 2009 10:13 pm

You did Batty. I noticed but think I was sulking at the time so couldn't comment. :D
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Postby Batty » Fri Oct 16, 2009 10:23 pm

You still haven't! :lol:
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Postby poohcarrot » Fri Oct 16, 2009 10:27 pm

Batty wrote:I did mention yonks ago, that I wondered if Juliet was named after Jules Rimet? Image


What a wonderful, astute and insightful comment. :D

I think you're right. The Romeo and Juliet bits obviously came after TP had thought of that pun.

Brilliant! :P
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Postby Batty » Fri Oct 16, 2009 10:35 pm

:lol: :mrgreen:
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Postby Tonyblack » Tue Nov 03, 2009 3:40 pm

I can't find the thread now, but I'm sure someone was asking about 'Bledlows' and where the name came from - whether it was a real university term or made up.

Well after a little research I discovered there's a village named Bledlow-cum-Saunderton just around 16 miles from where Terry grew up in Beaconsfield. :)
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Postby raisindot » Wed Nov 04, 2009 5:43 pm

Jan Van Quirm wrote:We have a fair number of American's on this site and though they may mostly be singular, intelligent and unusual people, being avid readers of not only Terry but many other authors as well, they're I expect pretty representative of people who like to read/own books over there. They're happy enough without chapters but, like most of the UK-born readers, don't mind when Terry does puts them in.


As one of those "fair number of Americans," I feel fairly confident representing all of us Yank Discworld readers in saying we don't give a rat's pattootie about whether there are chapters are not.

But I find myself agreeing with Pooh (a really scary thing in itself) that PTerry is not very popular in America. I have been to one of his book readings, in the center of Boston, one of the largest communities of students and fantasy/SF geeks in the world, and there were no more than 100 people in the audience on a perfectly warm fall night nearly right after publication of his latest book at that time.

In 15 years of riding in trains, buses and subways, I have seen only one person reading a DW book, and she was from England.

When I reserved UA through the inter-library loan system, I noticed I was one of only seven people in all of suburban Boston that had put a request for it. And when I decided to buy UA instead and went to my local Boredom Books, the clerk took one look at the (American) cover and said, "Oh, is this about Manchester United or something?"

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Postby poohcarrot » Wed Nov 04, 2009 10:14 pm

raisindot wrote: But I find myself agreeing with Pooh (a really scary thing in itself) that PTerry is not very popular in America.


:shock: :shock:
"Disliking Carrot would be like kicking a puppy."
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Postby Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit » Wed Nov 04, 2009 11:37 pm

I live in the mid-west... IL to be exact, and I see Terry's books in the return bins in the libraries, I see the shelves of the store's fill and empty, there are a lot more peeps here than in Britain.

I think he is gaining in popularity here. I don't give a fig about chapters, CHILDREN do. I think that Terry is getting much more popular with younger people. Kids tend to need a stopping point, so they can digest the books in smaller portions than, say, I did when I was in my most Pratchetty mode, I could read a book a night, no problem.

Kids have been raised on the idea here of "Chapter" books as being for Older kids, so they have grown in popularity. If publishers want to hook kids, then chapters are going to be the new norm. They don't need "spoiler" info, just a number that gives them a spot to put the marker in, brush their teeth and go to bed.
Aha! So, Bob's yer uncle... very clever.
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Postby Lady Vetinari » Wed Nov 04, 2009 11:44 pm

Personally I do prefer Chapters - I need a stopping point too otherwise I wouldn't get anything done :lol: ! As it's Pratchett I don't mind but I think that's why I like GP, MM and all the Childrens books more ... I know that my top five do not include these but they are in the top ten.
But I couldn't do what he does - with my novels - it's chapters, prologues, epilogues and acknowledgements and possibly transltion pages and historical notes ... :? Which makes it easier for me to plan. I also like the chapters titled - but short punchy titles - not like Dickens where he practically tells the story!
Who Watches The WatchMan?

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Postby lyn » Sat Nov 07, 2009 8:32 am

thanks Pooh.
just watched that bit of footage of the 1966 World Cup.
its always nice to get the background of a comment.

re the changing characters that have been mentioned.
I don't mind them growing into their changing roles as Ponder has now because he is no longer a student but has many responsibilities. he showed no modesty when Glenda said something about Pepe knowing important people. he said 'I am one'. it shows he has grown up.

I agree Lord Vetinari seemed more relaxed than in other books. he's not as uptight in his attitude. but it may have been because he was talking to Lady Magollota. he would speak differently to her than to others.

overall I enjoyed the book.
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Postby Finomans » Tue Jul 06, 2010 2:00 am

He was possibly a bit more relaxed because he was a bit "drunk".
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Postby poohcarrot » Tue Jul 06, 2010 8:00 am

Ye Gods Finomans! :shock: Your avi is a bit scarey. Who is it? :P
"Disliking Carrot would be like kicking a puppy."
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Postby high eight » Mon Jul 26, 2010 8:59 pm

poohcarrot wrote:Ye Gods Finomans! :shock: Your avi is a bit scarey. Who is it? :P


That's Boris Karloff as Ardath Bey (Imhotep in disguise) in The Mummy (1932)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mummy_%281932_film%29
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