Beautiful English

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Postby chris.ph » Sun Feb 15, 2009 4:16 pm

fubar :lol: my favourite acronym :lol: and my, punctuation s appalling :lol:
measuring intelligence by exam results is like measuring digestion by turd length
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Postby Straw Walker » Sun Feb 15, 2009 7:17 pm

I always thought TWAIN was a great acronym -Technology Without An Interesting Name, until I discovered that it was really linked to Kipling's 'Never the Twain shall meet'.
I think the answer lies in the soil, ooo arrr!
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Postby Catch-up » Sun Feb 15, 2009 10:33 pm

Oh no!! I'm gone for awhile and come back to see the "color" "colour" argument again!

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

I've found it's easier to just consider British English and American English two completely seperate languages and not worry about the differences. Having been on the CA forum for several years, I've had a lot of fun being educated on British English. I think it's (did I use my ' correctly?) safe to say that new language changes are always irritating to a lot of people. I also itch to correct misspellings and misplaced 's, even though I often get them wrong myself. :oops: :lol: Text-speak makes me absolutely nuts! :x But, for the most part, I just try to overlook this stuff and concentrate on the message. :)
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Postby Tonyblack » Mon Feb 16, 2009 8:36 am

Catch-up wrote:Oh no!! I'm gone for awhile and come back to see the "color" "colour" argument again!

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

What argument? - we are all above such things here. :wink:
"Goodness is about what you do. Not what you pray to."
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Postby Nienna » Mon Feb 16, 2009 10:34 am

There is only one 'mis-use' of the English language that I hate. I use it (mostly) correctly myself, because it's easy for me. I'm sort of good at spelling and remembering it and grammar and vocabulary. I think it's about one of the only things I am actually good at. :roll: HOWEVER... I don't really mind people twisting the language a bit. In fact sometimes I like seeing it, because it means a new little bit of linguistic evolution is happening in front of my eyes, and that sort of intrigues me. But, as I say, there is one thing that REALLY grates on my nerves, and it is this:-

"I done it."
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Postby Tonyblack » Mon Feb 16, 2009 10:43 am

I'm with Tiffany Aching in her annoyance of the word 'literally' in the wrong context.

I also find annoying, people who constantly say "at the end of the day" during a conversation.

Sorry Straw Walker - this has gone from being a topic about the beauty of the English language to what annoys us about it.

I have to say that I have the deepest admiration for foreigners who learn to speak English so well. I have spent quite some time in the Netherlands and most people there seem to be able to speak very good English. Certainly better than my Dutch. :oops:
"Goodness is about what you do. Not what you pray to."
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Postby Dotsie » Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:30 am

A Dutch guy I met once told me it's because all the English & American TV they watch has subtitles, as opposed to the rest of Europe which has dubbed TV.

"Commence to start" - part of a very funny footnote in Wyrd Sisters, but which I can't remember right now!
What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!
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Postby Dotsie » Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:31 am

Tonyblack wrote:I also find annoying, people who constantly say "at the end of the day" during a conversation.


But Nessa from Gavin & Stacey does that, & I think she's brilliant! (No word of a lie)
What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!
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Postby Tonyblack » Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:38 am

Dotsie wrote:A Dutch guy I met once told me it's because all the English & American TV they watch has subtitles, as opposed to the rest of Europe which has dubbed TV.

That's absolutely true. My friend has cable and she can get German and Italian channels, both of which dub their movies.

We went to see one of the Harry Potter movies when I was there and it was being shown it two cinemas in the multiplex. You could either watch it dubbed into Dutch or in English with subtitles. The English version we went to see was packed. :D
"Goodness is about what you do. Not what you pray to."
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Postby Catch-up » Mon Feb 16, 2009 12:08 pm

I'm with you Tony, I'm in awe of anyone who can fluently learn a second language. While we were on our honeymoon in Europe, we encountered only a couple people who didn't speak English (Derek said "Thank god numbers are the same everywhere!" :lol: ). We always learned a few polite phrases in each country though, so we could at least greet people in their own language before asking if they speak English.
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Postby Straw Walker » Mon Feb 16, 2009 12:32 pm

Tonyblack wrote:I'm with Tiffany Aching in her annoyance of the word 'literally' in the wrong context.

I also find annoying, people who constantly say "at the end of the day" during a conversation.

Sorry Straw Walker - this has gone from being a topic about the beauty of the English language to what annoys us about it.

I have to say that I have the deepest admiration for foreigners who learn to speak English so well. I have spent quite some time in the Netherlands and most people there seem to be able to speak very good English. Certainly better than my Dutch. :oops:


That's OK Tony, I'll strike a bit of balance here then :D

Like Tiffany Aching in Wee Free Men I like onomatopoeic words. I like the word 'Onomatopoeic' even if I had to check the spelling :D Like her I think that there should be a word to describe words like glisten and gleam. I just think that passage in WFM is wonderful and such an insight into Tiffany and perhaps Pterry as well.

I have often talked to Dutch radio hams and have always admired their grasp of English so thanks to Dotsie for the explanation.
I think the answer lies in the soil, ooo arrr!
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Postby chris.ph » Mon Feb 16, 2009 7:17 pm

i really detest manager speak . i was in a meeting last year and an arcitect said something about blue sky thinking, i didnt engage brain before answering him with "are you taking the p''s" my contracts manager nearly had a heart attack :lol: :lol:
measuring intelligence by exam results is like measuring digestion by turd length
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Postby Jan Van Quirm » Mon Feb 16, 2009 8:27 pm

We had a friend who married a Dutch woman and she and her 2 sons (8 & 11) not only spoke English fluently, but also French and German - and Dutch naturally. Very galling as my Dutch is virtually non-existent and my German is gratuitously confined to ordering beer and food and beer... :P

Still - I always make sure to know how to say please and thank you and how to ask for beer and where to find the facilities if I'm going somewhere English isn't widely spoken - gotta try a little bit. :oops:
"Some men see things as they are and ask why. Others dream things that never were and ask why not.” George Bernard Shaw
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Postby Tiffany » Mon Feb 16, 2009 8:43 pm

I have never been anywhere except Britian. I'm certainly a stay at home.
I do have pen pals all over the World though & they all write far better English than I speak, in Countries where English isn't their first language, I'd better add. :D
I love the way my Japanese pen pal phrases things. :D
Best wishes,
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Postby Straw Walker » Mon Feb 16, 2009 9:01 pm

Tiffany wrote:I have never been anywhere except Britian. I'm certainly a stay at home.
I do have pen pals all over the World though & they all write far better English than I speak, in Countries where English isn't their first language, I'd better add. :D
I love the way my Japanese pen pal phrases things. :D


Oh I'm so relieved Tiff, I thought I was the only person In the country who had never strayed from these shores and I live closer to France than London!
I've really never felt the need as there is so much I haven't yet seen in Britain. Perhaps one day Austria because I love their architecture.
I think the answer lies in the soil, ooo arrr!
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