mC's "Cooking for Dummies" Thread

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Postby BobtheDrog » Tue Sep 13, 2011 12:41 pm

Mushroom Risotto
For the mushrooms:
255g Fresh mixed mushrooms
10g Dried forest mushrooms
2 Tbsp Olive oil
1 Tsp picked thyme or 3 whole sprigs
1 clove garlic
Salt and pepper to taste

For the risotto:
1½ to 2 litres chicken or vegetable stock
1 Tbsp olive oil
3 finely chopped shallot or 2 medium onions
½ a leek thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic finely chopped
400g Risotto rice Arborio or Carnoli
100ml Dry vermouth or dry white wine
70g butter
100g freshly grated Parmesan

For the Mushrooms:
1 Slice or tear the mushrooms and add 1 Tbsp of olive oil to a hot frying pan
2 Add the mushrooms and thyme and cook for roughly one minute
3 Then add the garlic and cook for 2 more minutes or until the mushrooms are done
4 Season them to your taste

For the Risotto:
1 Bring stock to the boil, then reduce the temperature to a slow simmer
2 In a separate pan heat 2 Tbsp of olive oil to a medium heat, then add the onion
3 After about 3 minutes add the garlic and leek, when all the vegetables have softened add the rice.
4 Now turn the heat up and fry the rice stirring continuously after 2-3 minutes it should start to take on a translucent look
5 Add you wine or vermouth at all time keep stirring, when that has been absorbed add your first ladle of stock and 1/3 of the mushrooms
6 Turn the heat down to medium its important not to use too high a heat or the liquid will evaporate too quickly and the rice won’t cook
7 Keep adding the stock a ladleful at a time waiting until the last one has been absorbed this should take about 15 minutes. Taste the rice while stirring when done it should be soft but with a very slight bite
8 Then remove it from the heat and add the remaining mushrooms stir for 30 seconds, then add the butter & ¾ of the cheese, stirring it gently until melted it’s through. Serve immediately with extra parmesan on top and black pepper to taste.
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Postby BobtheDrog » Tue Sep 13, 2011 12:47 pm

Thai style Pumpkin Soup – serves 6

Ingredients
500g pumpkin, peeled and chopped (or you can use unsweetened canned pumpkin)
600ml vegetable stock
400ml tinned coconut milk
1 medium onion
2 cloves of garlic
5g cumin seeds
1 deseeded red chili
1 inch ginger root peeled and sliced thinly
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tbsp sunflower oil
2 tbsp Schwarz lemongrass and coconut seasoning
fresh coriander sprigs
pumpkin seeds

Method
1 Preheat oven to 180ºC, Gas mark 6
2 Place the pumpkin in a roasting tray, mix with 1 tbsp oil and sprinkle with salt. Roast for 35 minutes
3 When the pumpkin is done start the soup
4 In a heavy based pan heat the remaining oil, gently fry the shallots, cumin seeds, garlic, chili and ginger for 6 minutes
5 Add the pumpkin and fry for 3 minutes making sure to mix it in well
6 Add the stock and bring to the boil
7 Reduce the heat, add the seasoning and allow to simmer for 7-8 minutes
8 Blend the pumpkin mixture while slowly adding the coconut milk. Remember to shake the coconut milk well before opening the tin, keep a little back to garnish
9 Reheat the soup gently making sure its seasoned to taste and fry the pumpkin seeds for approximately 1 minute
10 To serve, ladle the soup into serving bowls and sprinkle with coriander sprigs, pumpkin seeds and a swirl of coconut millk
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Postby Tonyblack » Tue Sep 13, 2011 12:50 pm

Yum! :D
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Postby pip » Tue Sep 13, 2011 1:14 pm

Bewleys did go through that odd phase. :D

Excellent recipes though Bob :D
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Postby deldaisy » Tue Sep 13, 2011 1:47 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol:

I would SO buy a cookbook written by mC or Roo.

I showed a friend the way you write recipes mC and she split her sides laughing.
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Postby BobtheDrog » Tue Sep 13, 2011 3:14 pm

pip wrote:Bewleys did go through that odd phase. :D

Excellent recipes though Bob :D


yup for a start it wasn't called Bewleys at the time :wink:
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Postby michelanCello » Tue Sep 13, 2011 6:05 pm

deldaisy wrote::lol: :lol: :lol:

I would SO buy a cookbook written by mC or Roo.

I showed a friend the way you write recipes mC and she split her sides laughing.

Maybe she was laughing at my grammar mistakes :P
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Postby Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit » Tue Sep 13, 2011 6:11 pm

BobtheDrog wrote:10g Dried forest mushrooms


And nobody wonders why Del is running Aboot seeing things? :twisted:
Aha! So, Bob's yer uncle... very clever.
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Postby deldaisy » Tue Sep 13, 2011 6:15 pm

Tina a.k.a.SusanSto.Helit wrote:
BobtheDrog wrote:10g Dried forest mushrooms


And nobody wonders why Del is running Aboot seeing things? :twisted:


:lol: :lol:

More like the
100ml Dry vermouth or dry white wine


What can I say? I am a cheap drunk!
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Postby Willem » Tue Sep 13, 2011 7:40 pm

Cooking's fun, I used to do it all the time and will do again as soon as I've got my own place again :) I agree on making more than you need then putting it in the freezer, saves so much time when you're home late.


This '3-year-olds should be able to make a sandwich' thing surprised me a bit. Will start working on that tomorrow. How long before she's allowed to make me a grilled cheese sandwich?


And another easy but yummy recipe:

Chicken&Spinach spaghetti

Boil some water and throw in some spaghetti. Bonus points for throwing it in the pot on the stove from the living room. Check the spaghetti package on how long it should take.
Now, I usually use frozen spinach with the cream already added since it's cheap and easy. Put as many of it as you need (usually, I need more than I think I need) in a pan, let it defrost on a small flame. Again, check the package on the best way to cook it :)

While waiting for the water to start boiling and the spinach to defrost, cut up as much chicken you think you need. Season with chicken spices. Put on a frying pan with some oil or butter, whichever you prefer.

Intermission with a factoid I picked up about using oil in the kitchen:
- apparently you should use the cheaper oils when cooking in it. The more expensive, tastier oils are mostly for salad dressing and such - the cooking makes it lose lots of flavour so it's a bit of a waste.

By now you're at the stage I call 'don't panic!'. Your water's boiling, your oil is thinking of starting to smoke and your spinach needs a stir. All flames on low, breathe in, breathe out. Chicken in the pan, spoon in the spinach, spatula to move around the chicken, stuff like that. Juggle around your tasks till everything's done - the only thing you should make sure of is that your chicken's well done. I usally use the spatula to cut some pieces in two and check how they look inside. Probably best to embiggen the flame under the chicken for now so it's done faster and gets nice and crispy.

You can add some chopped mushrooms if you like (I do), put those in the pan with the chicken pieces when those are goldenbrown all round (but not necessarily well done yet).

You can serve all this in seperate pots and pans and let people mix it up themselves. I prefer to mix up the chicken/mushroom stuff with the spinach since the chickeny oil adds some extra flavour to the spinach. Lovely with some pepper but I let people add this themselves too (I'm a pretty lazy cook really).



Oh and talking about grilled cheese sandwiches and chicken: try making a grilled cheese sandwich and put some chicken spices on the cheese itself, and on the outside of the bread (with butter). Depending on the brand of spices, this tastes great!
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Postby michelanCello » Tue Sep 13, 2011 7:44 pm

:D

That sounds great, Willem! I love the combination of chicken ans spinach! Might try this tomorrow... :wink: Ow, not tomorrow, tomorrow's a busy day, maybe thursday :P
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Postby Willem » Tue Sep 13, 2011 7:50 pm

It's a really good choice for a busy day since it's so easy to make, most of the time is spent waiting for the water to boil :)
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Postby chris.ph » Tue Sep 13, 2011 7:53 pm

boil the kettle its quicker than the range willem
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Food

Postby Roo » Wed Sep 14, 2011 12:25 am

Crispy streaky smoked bacon with melted stilton cheese on thick slices of granary toast oh and a glass of good port to wash it down :)
Damn the siren song of the crackers and Brussels pate calls me away from the keyboard once more.
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Postby Dotsie » Wed Sep 14, 2011 8:06 am

michelanCello wrote:So if you have your turkey slices, take the...erm... I don't know what it's called... kitchen hammer? Makes the meat softer.

It's called a tenderiser, but now I prefer kitchen hammer :wink: That's it's new name :D
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