Banned Book Week Coming Up

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Postby chris.ph » Sun Sep 21, 2008 12:57 pm

i cant get over that flowers for algernon is on the list i cant c anything offensive in it just sad and poigniant :x
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Postby Tonyblack » Sun Sep 21, 2008 1:07 pm

Yes, we did it in school. It's a thoughtful book that deals with some interesting subjects. Crazy!
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Postby Jinx » Sun Sep 21, 2008 1:38 pm

I had heard 1984 was banned, does anyone know where, when and why?

I remember something about it being because it had communist ideals, which seems off to me. 1984 is my absolute most favourite book and I'm sure it was set against communism. At least by Marx's design. I suspect it may have been more a case of the views on socialism and authority.
The problem is now I think about it, I'm sure I must have the reason for banning confused with Brave New World, which I have to get round to reading too.
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Postby Tonyblack » Sun Sep 21, 2008 1:46 pm

Orwell (Eric Blair) was very sympathetic to the Communist cause and fought during the Spanish Civil War. But he became disillusioned with how the Communist ideal was twisted by the likes of Stalin. That's clear to see in Animal Farm and certainly in 1984.
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Postby Dotsie » Sun Sep 21, 2008 2:15 pm

Probably what I said before was not how I really feel - I wouldn't ban a book in school, if children brought in a book on how creationism is scientific fact they wouldn't be in trouble, but I certainly wouldn't allow it to be taught, in science or RE classes. Children should definitely learn to think for themselves, but part of that is learning the difference between fact and belief.

Book burners are a strange bunch of people indeed, scared to let people think for themselves, incase what they discover doesn't sit well with the local beliefs.
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Postby silverstreak » Sun Sep 21, 2008 7:05 pm

stormblade wrote:IMHO the only books that should be banned are those that inspire or incite people to violence

for example if there was a book like How to build a bomb and best place to put it to cause maximum carnage it would be banned in my perfect world

sorry


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Postby Jarmara » Sun Sep 21, 2008 7:05 pm

Books don't kill people, people do :wink:
Contains Strong Language, Fantasy Violence and Mild Peril

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Postby swreader » Tue Sep 23, 2008 1:27 am

Interestingly enough 1984, written in 1949, has not been banned except in the Soviet Union (where it was banned until 1988). In 1981, a Baptist minister in Jackson County, Florida challenged the novel's suitability as proper reading for young Americans, arguing it contained pro-Communist and sexually explicit material, which is particularly odd since it was much more like the Soviet Union in the years after it was written than it was any of the western countries.

And if a few more people read it now, it might scare the living daylights out of some people--both in the US and the UK. Wiki describes it as follows:

It tells the story of Winston Smith, a functionary at the Ministry of Truth, whose work consists of editing historical accounts to fit the government's policies. The book has major significance for its vision of an all-knowing government which uses pervasive and constant surveillance of the populace, insidious and blatant propaganda, and brutal control over its citizens. The book had a substantial impact both in literature and on the perception of public surveillance, inspiring such terms as 'Big Brother' and 'Orwellian'.

It seems to me that Orwell was simply ahead of his time--the title should have been something more like 2024. But, perhaps we can stilll keep government from re-writing history and changing the meaning of words, But the price of freedom is awareness and action.
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Postby Jinx » Tue Sep 23, 2008 1:43 am

Interesting point about 1984, is that when Winston first wrote in his diary he wasn't certain of the date. I can't remember the exact date entered but it was in April 1984. He wasn't certain that this was the date, he wasn't even sure of the year.

Also, 1984 was published in 1949 but written in 1948. I suspect Orwell went with '84 because it was '48 reversed.


swreader wrote:In 1981, a Baptist minister in Jackson County, Florida challenged the novel's suitability as proper reading for young Americans, arguing it contained pro-Communist and sexually explicit material

Now I know what it was I had heard. Thanks for that.
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