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Postby Who's Wee Dug » Sat Jan 16, 2010 7:31 pm

And some of the close's were quite long with the cludgy at one end :wink: ah! that brings back some memories.,and if you tied a bit string to the door opposite and rapped them both before you shot the craw.Image
He willnae tak' a drink! I think he's deid! , on the other hand though A Midgie in yir hand is worth twa up yir kilt.
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Postby janet » Sun Jan 17, 2010 1:17 pm

I still have a copy of 'The silent miaow' somewhere....wonderful book :D
Paul Gallico also wrote a novel called 'Jenny' about a boy who becomes a cat and learns many lessons about being human. Jenny is his cat mentor.
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Postby Tonyblack » Sun Jan 17, 2010 1:22 pm

He's a very good writer of all sorts of books. The Snow Goose and The Poseidon Adventure are two of his best known ones. I've got an excellent book by him called The Man Who Was Magic. :D I've also got books by him called 'Scruffy' and 'The House That Wouldn't Go Away', which I haven't read yet.

Sadly, a lot of his books are no longer in print, but you can still find them second hand if you look.
"Goodness is about what you do. Not what you pray to."
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Postby Danny B » Sun Jan 17, 2010 9:24 pm

The game was called, just like for Janet, Knocky-Nine-Doors in my own bit of Northumbeland. We would often combine it with the sport so common to colliery rows across the land, known to us as Hedge-Hopping. A sort of Privet based hurdles, stretching the entire length of a coal field terrace. In the town I grew up in, some of those rows are about ¾ of a mile long. The object of the game was basically to perform swan dives over a collection of hedges and fences, while the irate people whose door/window/door and window you had just knocked on chased you down in order to give you a wallop on the head, or "dad yer lugs" as we called it.

Find enclosed, the google map of the Hedge Hop Marathon. *Sighs*, happy days.
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Postby chris.ph » Mon Jan 18, 2010 6:59 pm

we used to go scrumping up my fathers mates orchard until he put a goat in it :lol: then i had a brainwave of rynning around the tree which the goat was chained until the goat was pinned to the tree :twisted: i know its cruel but its still funny, and then we used to raid the orchard :D
one morning my mother called me, i went to see what she wanted and the bloody goat was tied around our line post , she made me unfurl the goat and take it back as she reckoned that i knew the evil swine :lol: :lol: it never chased me after that so i had a free reign in the orchard :lol: :lol:
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Postby janet » Mon Jan 18, 2010 9:01 pm

Danny B wrote:The game was called, just like for Janet, Knocky-Nine-Doors in my own bit of Northumbeland. We would often combine it with the sport so common to colliery rows across the land, known to us as Hedge-Hopping. A sort of Privet based hurdles, stretching the entire length of a coal field terrace. In the town I grew up in, some of those rows are about ¾ of a mile long. The object of the game was basically to perform swan dives over a collection of hedges and fences, while the irate people whose door/window/door and window you had just knocked on chased you down in order to give you a wallop on the head, or "dad yer lugs" as we called it.

Find enclosed, the google map of the Hedge Hop Marathon. *Sighs*, happy days.


My lugs never got dadded but only cos I was a girl wearing glasses and an innocent expression!
I grew up within spitting distance of the colliery rows.
Knocky-Nine-Doors wasn't one of our favourite games. We had too much to do to be involved in much divilment in my youth. We had a 'green' at the end of our street (long since having had two houses built on it) where we buried the corpses of little dead things like birds or mice and performed little funerals with stick crosses. We had the run of the area and no fear of anything. The swings.....the annual funfair. I never hear the song 'Carolina Moon' without regressing 40-odd years.
In case anyone's wondering, my brother was only about 4 at the time of his trauma, we all laughed like drains and now he's a PhD and University Fellow.....so much for the lamer members of our childhood fraternity.
Karma :D
:lol: Chris :lol:
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