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state the obvious game

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Re: state the obvious game

Post by =Tamar » Sat Mar 04, 2017 8:35 pm

Then in my opinion you've missed some good books.
They are mostly cheerful but not all. I am very fond of The Dark Lord of Derkholm, which spoofs your average quest novel and is nevertheless a good book in its own right. Deep Secret is another good one. Howl's Moving Castle should be easy to find; be warned, the anime film is not much like the book. If you prefer your SF a bit grimmer, The Homeward Bounders might suit.

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Re: state the obvious game

Post by RathDarkblade » Sun Mar 05, 2017 2:02 am

:lol: !!! I just read the synopsis of The Dark Lord of Derkholm on book depository. It does indeed sound very funny. I'll give it a try. :D

Most of the books I've read in the past 12 years or so (except of course for Pterry) have been concerned with history, mythology, linguistics and science. Not at all as dry as it may appear - in fact, lots of fun. :)
Words are the litmus paper of the mind. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word "commence" in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say "Enter", don’t stop to pack.

--Small Gods

 
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Re: state the obvious game

Post by =Tamar » Sun Mar 05, 2017 7:11 pm

obvious: What do you mean, except for Pterry? His books are concerned with history, mythology, linguistics and science!

Speaking of mythology, although Gaiman's latest is apparently titled Norse Mythology, there's another book with that title, better known by its subtitle: "North Mythology According to Uncle Einar". It's by Jane Sibley, and should be readily available. I suspect it's funnier than Gaiman's.

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Re: state the obvious game

Post by RathDarkblade » Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:56 am

Not-at-all-obvious: I don't know about books of Norse mythology, but I educated myself in Norse and Anglo-Saxon themes over about 10-11 years of writing my first novel-length book, a series of short-story-sized adventurettes set in the late Viking age, and interlinked to form a rags-to-riches story as a churl accidentally becomes a thane, and then goes on to actually learn about being a thane. :)

I initially wrote it as a one-chapter short story, but as I read more and more about the period and about many aspects thereof, I became more inspired to try writing more and more. I set out to make it entertaining, as well as (I hoped) at least a little educational - for people who don't know much about history, but would like to know. :)

Alas, I shall not publish it: it has far too many holes. :| But it served as a good grounding for writing many other stories... ;)
Words are the litmus paper of the mind. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word "commence" in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say "Enter", don’t stop to pack.

--Small Gods

 
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Re: state the obvious game

Post by =Tamar » Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:17 am

Without necessarily disagreeing with your judgement, I might point out that many fine novels have plot holes the size of the Kessel run.
Still, sometimes it's best for early work to remain unknown and unmourned.

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Re: state the obvious game

Post by RathDarkblade » Sun Mar 12, 2017 1:46 pm

Well... I don't know. It's a work of alternative fiction, in which Anglo-Saxon England remains un-Christianised, William the Conq loses the battle of Hastings through a catastrophic error of judgment, Svein Forkbeard and Canute the Great become one person (to make the journey easier)... and every so often, we can see and hear what the Norse gods and goddesses are up to in Valhalla, where they are as boisterous and fun as the Discworld gods (or the Greek gods... or any gods).

Also, the names of places and people are playfully parodied; the only Kings of England (or, should I say, Anglo-lund - because this is alternative fiction, after all) are affectionate parodies of Ethelred the Unready and Canute, and eventually our heroes have to face down and defeat a witch-hunter with the authority and the resources of a Prince. There is much comedy here, but also tragedy, and (eventually) a bitter-sweet-but-happy ending... of sorts. We even see a glimpse of 11th-century Scotland.

With a cast of thousands, including merchants, guards, torturers, assassins, hangmen, skalds, a holy man or two, and many more holy women. Also featuring Harald Hardraade, Tostig, and William the Bastard as themselves. (And a thousand elephants! :D Well, not really - but lots of horses!) ;)

How does that sound? :)
Words are the litmus paper of the mind. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word "commence" in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say "Enter", don’t stop to pack.

--Small Gods

 
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Re: state the obvious game

Post by =Tamar » Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:20 pm

Sounds like fun! I'm of the opinion that "Canute" was a phonetic spelling of "Knut" anyway.

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Re: state the obvious game

Post by RathDarkblade » Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:18 am

OK, back to stating the obvious... Canute wasn't really trying to turn back the waves. Gah. I'm surprised how often that myth still gets trundled out. "Nyah, nyah! That Canute guy was such an idiot!" etc. Sigh!
Words are the litmus paper of the mind. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word "commence" in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say "Enter", don’t stop to pack.

--Small Gods

 
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Re: state the obvious game

Post by =Tamar » Tue Mar 21, 2017 5:11 am

Of course he wasn't. He was trying to make a point about some absurd flattery the sycophants at his court thought he'd fall for.
Traditionally, March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb OR vice versa. You'd think it would be obvious which one is happening.
This year it seems as though the lion and lamb, instead of lying down, are playing Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush.

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Re: state the obvious game

Post by RathDarkblade » Sat Mar 25, 2017 9:52 am

Um, I don't think I quite understand that...? :?
Words are the litmus paper of the mind. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word "commence" in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say "Enter", don’t stop to pack.

--Small Gods

 
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Re: state the obvious game

Post by =Tamar » Sat Mar 25, 2017 10:45 pm

The weather. Back about twenty years ago, the weather in March would either be warm at the beginning (spring thaw) and then turn cold, or be cold at the beginning and turn warm (early spring). Nowadays it goes around and around and the temperature pops up and down, like the animals in the nursery rhyme song:
Round and round the mulberry bush
the monkey chased the weasel.
The monkey thought it was all in fun.
Pop goes the weasel!)

Obviously I wasn't clear enough. :-)

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Re: state the obvious game

Post by RathDarkblade » Wed Mar 29, 2017 11:38 am

Ah, fair enough. I've never been to England (but this May I will rectify that!), so naturally I'm not familiar with March weather or the "Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush" nursery rhyme (although I am familiar on some variations on "Pop goes the weasel").

Back to obvious things... Donald Trump makes me very, very scared. :shock:
Words are the litmus paper of the mind. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word "commence" in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say "Enter", don’t stop to pack.

--Small Gods

 
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Re: state the obvious game

Post by =Tamar » Sat Apr 01, 2017 1:13 am

A penny for a spool of thread/A penny for a needle/That's the way the money goes/Pop goes the weasel!

Staying up all night reading the net makes it very difficult to get anything done during the next day.

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Re: state the obvious game

Post by RathDarkblade » Sun Apr 02, 2017 12:13 pm

Hmm... the theory I saw once about "Pop Goes the Weasel" - I believe it was in Dodger's Guide to London - was that destitute miners used to pawn their tools in order to get enough money to eat. The act of pawning was known as "popping" their tools into the pawn shop. Thus the rhyme:

Penny for some strawberry jam,
Penny for some treacle;
That's the way the money goes -
Pop! Goes the weasel.

Not sure where weasels come into it, though. Maybe a long-forgotten word for some kind of mining tool? :think:
Words are the litmus paper of the mind. If you find yourself in the power of someone who will use the word "commence" in cold blood, go somewhere else very quickly. But if they say "Enter", don’t stop to pack.

--Small Gods

 
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Re: state the obvious game

Post by raisindot » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:00 pm

"Weasal" refers to the coats of poor people. "Pop goes the weasal" means "pawning one's coat." The nursery rhyme is an allegory for the endless cycle of debt among the downtrodden. The "monkey" represents debt collectors and the rich and powerful, who "take sport" in endlessly oppressing the lower classes that attempt to rise out of poverty.

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